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American Archivists

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Continuing Professional Education Program Catalog

 

A comprehensive, alphabetical listing of programs - including descriptions, program objectives, instructor bios, and attendee testimonials - offered by SAA and available for co-sponsorship (web seminars excluded).

 

A-C » D-F » G-I » J-O » P-R » S-Z

 

Classroom and AV Requirements
Instructors

 


[NEW!]
Achieving E-mail Account Preservation with XML

(1/2 day, 0.37 CEUs, 2.5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

How do you successfully manage and preserve e-mail? Your instructor will explain the XML preservation schema for e-mail accounts co-authored and used by the Collaborative Electronic Records Project (CERP) at the Smithsonian Institution Archives and Rockefeller Archive Center and the Electronic Mail Collaboration Initiative (EMCAP ) in North Carolina, Kentucky, and Pennsylvania. One of the benefits of using the EMA schema is effective, efficient preservation of e-mail accounts and their messages. The schema can be used in trustworthy repositories to validate deposited e-mail accounts, and can also be adopted as a professional standard like METS and EAD.

Workshop objectives:

  • Why use XML;
  • Identify the tools for XML and for parsing;
  • Anticipate the preparation necessary before preservation;
  • Assess e-mail account and message condition;
  • Master the breakdown of the schema and its application to e-mail accounts;
  • Understand why the instructors take the account-level approach; and
  • Develop ways to use the schema and related tools at your own organization.

Some understanding of XML/HTML, such as recognizing the basic structure of an XML document, is useful!

Please bring your laptop with a CD drive or USB port for "hands-on" experience. You are strongly encouraged to download the CERP parser from the CERP website at http://www.siarchives.si.edu/cerp/parserdownload.htm and review the installation guide prior to the workshop.

The instructor will review the installation at the workshop.

Who should attend? Archivists, records managers, and librarians who are or will be handling e-mail and other electronic records.

Attendance is limited to 40.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "The entire subject and the progress on addressing the e-mail problem. Generally speaking, this session made my brain hurt a bit, which is a good thing and more than most Pre-conference workshops do! Very nice to see folks taking a stab at this issue to move beyond theory."
  • "Detailed discussion of EMCAP and CERP projects that aren't on their websites (got questions answered from the creators) –that was great!
  • "Organizational structure, built on progressive new knowledge."
  • "Understanding the value of the XML schema."

 

Advanced Appraisal for Archivists

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

This workshop builds on the fundamentals of appraisal as presented in SAA’s Selecting and Appraising Archives and Manuscripts (AFS II). It focuses on four important components of appraisal that aren’t included in the manual:  1) The interrelationship of basic archival theory with appraisal theory (how archivists think about the concept of records and the purpose of archives, and how that intersects with how archivists think about selecting records); 2) the seemingly intractable problem of applying appraisal theory and method in practice adequate to the huge amount of material to be appraised; 3) archival ethics as applied to collection development, donor relations, and appraisal; and 4) the theory, method, practice, and policy of reappraisal and deaccessioning.

Workshop objectives:

  • Review the implications of archives appraisal theory and method;
  • Consider the reasons for the disjuncture between appraisal theory and appraisal practice;
  • Identify specific techniques to bring the practice of appraisal into congruence with the number and bulk of materials to be appraised (application of these techniques can reduce processing backlogs as well);
  • Grapple with some of the ethical issues embedded in appraisal and related functions (collection development, donor relations); and
  • Move from understanding the theory of reappraisal to its practice, including specific attention to donor relations and other “political” considerations.

Who should attend? Archivists who have experience in appraisal and managers/administrators of archival programs.

Attendance is limited to 40.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "Background history of appraisal to present day and open discussion about issues."
  • "The discussion about ethics/examinations of case studies. [It was] helpful to hear how other archivists would handle certain situations."
  • "Discussion of reappraisal policies and practice and discussion of history of appraisal - [there is] no universal solution. [You] take what applies and works for your institution."
  • "The notebook of slides was very convenient for note taking and will be an excellent review of course information. These classes are always very inspiring and informative."

 


[UNDER REVISION]
Advanced Electronic Records: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of Electronic Records Programs

(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

This advanced workshop is geared towards academic repositories. Presentations, discussions, and individual and group exercises address methods that can be used in archival electronic records program design, implementation, and evaluation.

Workshop objectives:

  • Consider identification, explication, and differentiation between the findings and activities of influential research and development projects in the United States, Canada, and Australia;
  • Review key national and international records management, electronic records management, and metadata standards;
  • Examine the implications of research findings and current standards for best practices relating to the creation, preservation, description, and use of electronic records; and
  • Identify research outcomes, variables, incentives, and enterprising approaches that might be applied in the design, implementation, and evaluation of local individual and cooperative electronic records programs.

Who should attend? Archivists who already have some theoretical knowledge or practical experience with electronic records, or who have attended a Basic Electronic Records workshop. It might be appropriate, on a case-by-case basis, to invite IT colleagues to register.

Participants are strongly encouraged to bring with them examples of existing electronic records program or planning documents from their own institutions.

Attendance is limited to 30.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "Getting an overview of relevant standards was really useful. The exercises were good for thinking about how our own institutions might apply the standards." - Valerie Gillispie
  • "The real-life case scenarios were most valuable to me. If I had heard only the case studies from Rockefeller and Smithsonian, the workshop [still] would have been worthwhile."
  • "Instructor's explanations of standards and standards development." - Daniel McCormack
  • "Take home book with lots of space for notes." - Kris Kobialka
  • "Everything was very useful because it brought to light things I should consider." - Deborah I. Gouin

 


 

Analyzing and Improving Archival Websites

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Familiar assessments of user needs include surveys, reference statistics, and informal consultations with the users of archival records and manuscript collections. In most cases, this feedback about user needs, preferences, and information-seeking behaviors is generated by direct contact with the individuals. But online archival databases, image repositories, and other electronic sources open a collection to new audiences and provide traditional users with a way to access materials without direct mediation. Web analytics tools provide a means to study user behavior by allowing archivists to gather anonymous statistical information about users and user interactions with the repository website. In conjunction with more traditional information points, Web analytics can serve as a springboard for a new understanding of users and user behavior.

Questions examined in this workshop include:

  • What types of content do online users really need and want?
  • Which design features help or hinder user access?
  • How do users arrive at a given website?
  • How do users navigate through the website once they arrive?

Workshop objectives:

  • Use Web analytics to supplement and extend other methods for studying archives use;
  • Design a Web analytics study that reflects the repository's and website's goals; 
  • Implement Web measurement tools such as Google Analytics* software; 
  • Interpret analytics reports;  and
  • Make suitable changes to archival Web resources in response to those reports.

*The use of Google Analytics in this SAA workshop does not represent or imply SAA endorsement of this or similar products.

Who should attend? Archivists with a limited technical background who have an interest in improving their repository's Web presence.

Attendance is limited to 25. Participants are asked to bring a laptop.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • “Everything.” - Ben Blake
  • “Best SAA pre-conference workshop or SAA program because it was all applicable to real situations.”
  • “Understanding how the analytics work - thought from advanced readings I'd never understand it, but I did!”
  • “I liked the discussions of existing websites that respond to the issues brought to our attention via the analytics stats.”
  • “The workshop provided a very good overview of Web analytics and the ways I might use analytics to prioritize our Web resources and plan on a major website redesign.”

 


 

Applying DACS to Single-Item Manuscript Cataloging

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Travel diaries, account books, commonplace books, ships’ logs, sermon notes, scrapbooks, autograph albums, single letters, poems…many of these single items possess great subject interest or were created by notable authors, and many attract researchers across disciplines with both teaching and exhibit potential. For the archivist, however, they are too often confusing, time-consuming, and challenging to identify and describe. How does one add to an artificial collection? Subject file? MARC 21 record? How does one write a DACS-compliant MARC record for a diary, anyway?

The instructors present criteria for undertaking description of single-item modern manuscripts and the choices available to the archivist; briefly review related standards, including AACR2 and AMREMM; and focus on the creation of full MARC 21 descriptions in compliance with Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS). Emphasis is placed on identification and description of a wide variety of single-item textual manuscripts, with some attention given to subject analysis and to determination of access points.

Workshop objectives:

  • Identify appropriate levels of description and access for a variety of single-item manuscripts;
  • Pinpoint solutions to the most frequent problems encountered in identifying and describing these materials; and
  • Create full DACS-compliant MARC 21 descriptions for single-item manuscripts.

This workshop includes lecture and discussion components, as well as hands-on cataloging exercises. Based on examples of  17th- to 20th-century textual manuscripts, this workshop is good preparation to tackle that pile of odd volumes at the end of a backlog.

Who should attend? This workshop will be most beneficial for archivists who are already at least somewhat familiar with standard cataloging practice and with the creation of MARC 21 records.

* Workshop fee includes the SAA publication, Describing Archives: A Content Standard (a $35 value!).

Attendance is limited to 30.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • “Examples! I will refer to the notebook as I go back to work.” - Michelle Belden
  • “The applied exercises with actual manuscripts - very good choices.” - Lauren Weinhold
  • “Everything - creation/use of building blocks required to implement DACS on this level makes the arrival of work less dizzy.”
  • “Clear, concise, well-organized presentations, on-topic. Will be helpful in our work. Got a lot of useful cataloging information for a beginner.”
  • “The handouts/exercises were especailly valuable. The were clear and illustrated pertinent points. Thanks for the bibliography!”

 


 

Archivists’ Guide to Balancing Legal Issues in Photographic Collections

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Uneasy about copyright when it comes to your repository’s photographic collections? Need some practical advice? This functional workshop will provide down-to-earth guidance to help you deal with copyright issues relevant to photographic materials in archival and library collections.

During this workshop you’ll:

  • Discuss the copyright framework for archives.
  • Use real-life examples to assist in understanding specific copyright issues confronting archivists, such as fair use, public domain, heritage collections.
  • Examine appropriate documents such as deeds of gift, loan agreements, copyright notices, etc.
  • Survey options for permissions.
  • Explore options when information is lacking.
  • Consider ethical and privacy guidelines for access and use.

Who should attend? Archivists and others whose collections include photographs.

Attendance limited to 40.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "Knowledge of presenters and ability to distill complex issues into understandable language and provide resources for further study."
  • "Real examples specific to photo collections."
  • "Copyright and publicity rights."
  • "Hard to say - I thought all aspects were valuable." - Paul Oelkrug
  • "I really liked the workshop book with the forms and extra information that is provided."
  • "A good overview of the material will help me better expose my clients to these issues." - Mary Hayes
  • "Specific legal citations/copyright chart." This class was a refresher for me, and I found it extremely valuable! I learned a lot and found the pacing and instruction just right." - Elizabeth Keathley

 


 

Arrangement and Description of Manuscript Collections

(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

This workshop focuses on the day-to-day decisions made in arranging and describing manuscript collections. That includes developing processing work plans, identifying common arrangement schemes for particular types of collections, and physically organizing materials during processing. Essential elements of a finding aid, applying descriptive standards, and the creative construction of container lists are highlighted as well.

Day One: The Patterns of Arrangement

Day Two: The Craft of Description

Workshop objectives:

  • Understand the concepts and principles of arrangement;
  • Learn to arrange various types of manuscript collections and formats;
  • Identify the essential elements of a finding aid;
  • Discuss the application of archival descriptive standards; and
  • Demonstrate an understanding of best practice.

Who should attend? Novices and seasoned archivists who want to learn more about processing manuscript collections effectively and efficiently.

*Workshop fee includes the SAA publication, Arranging and Describing Archives and Manuscripts (Archival Fundamentals Series II) by Kathleen Roe (a $49 value!).

Attendance is limited to 40.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "The explanations of the process/theories/application of the subject." - Naomi Taplin
  • "Aspects on arrangement - [I] always had problems with [a] poorly-arranged collection and how to fit it." - Monica Blank
  • "Excellent review, with new knowledge acquired. I found the entire workshop interesting and useful. If I had to choose most useful aspect[s], some would be the review of archival principles and practices, experiences of instructors and participants, and ideas for way to better handle real-life issues." - Valerie Anne Lutz
  • "Instructor's experience and knowledge and willingness to address questions: excellent. The handouts and PowerPoint w[ere] very valuable as they provided good structure for discussing and instruction. Bibliographic lists [were] good too. Excellent refresher and very current." - Brian A Hoduski
  • "Everything! I especially like the sample worksheets and electronic tools that the speakers [we]re using at their own institution[s]. VERY HELPFUL!" - Rona Razon
  • "I liked that the nitty gritty details of processing were covered. This is the sort of class I wish I had in library school."

 


 

Association Archives...Managing Your Institutional Memory

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Sometimes an association’s records are relegated to boxes in a back room – or simply tossed periodically without review. Sometimes staff and members continually reinvent the wheel because crucial “institutional memory” is lost. Avoid costly mistakes – and even see a return on investment! - from good management of association records by learning how to identify and maintain appropriate records. This workshop offers the practical information and tools necessary to identify records of enduring archival value and start an archives program that will benefit an association.

Workshop objectives:

  • Establish the essential elements of an archives/records management program;
  • Set appropriate goals for a particular association's archives program;
  • Systematically review association records;
  • Decide on the value of including various types of records in an archives;
  • Begin preserving and protecting important records by storing them appropriately;
  • Keep track of archival records for easy access; and
  • Evaluate whether records are best kept in-house or at another institution.

Who should attend? This workshop addresses association CEOs, communication staffers, records managers, or librarians who want to ensure effective management of an association’s important records.

Attendance limited to 30.

Responses to “what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "Steps to getting started." — Jeff Flom
  • "Preservation issues." — Diane A. Fagen
  • "Learning about [the] fragility of various media." — Michael Walters
  • "Storage containers and materials." — Richard Collins

 


 

Basic Electronic Records

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Archivists have to start somewhere, and this workshop provides the basics. Attendees are introduced to the principles of appraising, accessioning, preserving, and providing access to records in digital formats.

Workshop objectives:

  • Identify goals and objectives for addressing electronic records within a specific institution's mission;
  • Discuss and examine various technical and organizational issues; and
  • Develop a tentative plan for action within a specific organization.

Who should attend? This workshop is intended for archivists who have a good understanding of archival principles and techniques, but who need basic training in how to apply those principles to records in electronic form.

Attendance is limited to 30.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "Saw new solutions."
  • "Discussion of archival preservation standards was particularly useful, but all of it was valuable." - Karen Adler Abramson
  • "The discussion of various problems made the issues real."
  • "First-hand experience of instructor...[and] quality and quantity of group discussion…helped [me] to realize that other archivists are in the same boat."
  • "Made interesting…good handle on audience and its needs…addressed all of them."

 


 

Building Digital Collections

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

This seminar is customized specifically to help those responsible for planning and implementing digitization projects at the beginning and intermediate levels. It is important to understand the concepts and strategies essential to the successful implementation of a collection development or access project during the planning stage. Rather than addressing the more technical aspects of building a digital collection, this seminar provides an overview of basic decisions that must be made before and during the development of a digital collection and a digital repository program.

Questions examined in this seminar include:

  • Why digitize?
  • What to digitize?
  • How to digitize?
  • Who should do the digitizing?
  • What next?

Seminar objectives:

  • Understand selection criteria for digital projects;
  • Develop workflow models; and
  • Estimate the costs and resource needs for digital projects.

Case studies, real-world examples, and citations of published resources are presented in a format that allows time for questions, interaction, and discussion.

Who should attend? Archivists and others who are responsible for planning and implementing digitization projects at the beginning and intermediate level.

Attendance is limited to 40.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "I really enjoyed the flexibility of the presenters in taking comments and questions from the attendees - good discussion." - Kristy Sorensen
  • "I appreciated the level of preparation to present the material in the time allotted. Material was as described. Great introduction!" - Rachel Vagts
  • "The readings and workbook inclusions of sources for difficult topics were most valuable. The case studies worked well and broke up the hours of sitting." - Erin Royal.
  • "Helping me to develop a conceptual framework that will allow me to prioritize projects and workflow was most valuable. Also, [this] will help me justify projects to administration." - Jim Hofer.
  • "The small group break outs for scenario discussion and the discussion in the large group, relative to projects underway and process[es] for implementation, w[ere] most valuable to me." - Evelyn Bonner

 


 

Business Archives...Establishing and Managing an Archives

(3 days, 2.25 CEUs, 15 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

This workshop presents an overview of establishing and managing an archives in a business environment: what it takes to garner support from managment to establish an archival program and how to start, manage, or oversee a business archives. Over the course of three days, attendees have the opportunity to tour three business archives (locations vary) and address interrelationships among archives, corporate libraries, records management offices, and information centers.

Workshop objectives:

  • Understand the basic principles of archival theory and the practical implementation of that theory within a corporation;
  • Learn how to successfully market the archives and create a strong support structure for archival programs;
  • Explore legal issues that face a business archivist daily;
  • Develop a sound collecting strategy and a practical business plan;
  • Know how to develop a preservation strategy for the records in a collection;
  • Obtain an overview of the critical issues such as handling electronic records, changing technology, and multiple file formats;
  • Interface with working business archivists to see how they approach collections management; and
  • Return to the workplace with fresh perspectives and measurable benchmarking standards.

Who should attend? Archivists and others who are charged with starting, managing, or overseeing a business archives.

Attendance is limited to 25.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "This course was an excellent overview of how to start a business archives! I would recommend this course to anyone starting out in the field in building up a corporate archives or to more experienced corporate archivists interested in getting a new perspective. This was also an excellent opportunity to learn from my colleagues about how they deal with similar issues. I can't wait to apply everything I learned!" — Rebecca Contin
  • "I really liked the tours - very useful in comparing our own situation. I also appreciate making connections with professional archivists." — Russ Stephens
  • "I really liked the appraisal discussion and group work." — Alicia Shaver
  • "The materials supported the concepts and methods developed to date.  The course begins to lay out possible strategies for filling the voids in current planning." — Gary Wolfe

 


 

Copyright: The Archivist and the Law

(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

This two-day workshop provides a basis for the administration of copyright in daily archival work. One of the profession’s acknowledged experts, William Maher, presents updates to issues that should be tracked in the current age of information commerce—including an assessment of the bad news and the good news in the Supreme Court's Eldred decision.

Workshop objectives:

  • Recognize the complex issues relating to authors’, owners’, and users’ rights in intellectual property;
  • Obtain grounding in the historical rationale for copyright law, including major legislative and judicial developments;
  • Discover the relevance of U.S. federal law to archives and manuscript collections;
  • Examine the current law; and
  • Determine the sequence of decision-making steps needed to manage copyright issues.

Participants are invited to submit specific questions related to copyright up to two weeks prior to the workshop start date.

Who should attend? Archivists and other professionals who have copyright concerns.

Attendance is limited to 30.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "Readings, [the] ability to ask questions and clarify issues, and the time to focus on this area of our work!" - Vivian Nieman
  • "I learned so many things in this workshop! All my questions were answered very well. I feel I am returning to work with so much more knowledge." - Miranda Burton
  • "Excellent workshop! He does a wonderful job of clarifying a complex topic and making it a pleasant learning experience. Very positive approach and excellent presentation style. I feel much more able to address copyright issues as a result of this workshop." - Lisa Thompson

 


 

Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS)

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Learn practical DACS implementations: get an in-depth consideration of the key concepts and descriptive elements in Describing Archives: A Content Standard, the new U.S. standard. Explore strategies for incorporating this standard into workflows for accessioning, arrangement, and description through discussions and hands-on work with a variety of exercises, culminating in a DACS-based analysis of existing finding aids. This workshop, a basic introduction to the standard, focuses on application of DACS rules and concepts, which participants can apply to repository processes and descriptive outputs.

Workshop objectives:

  • Apply the rules to formulate the content of descriptive elements for a minimal standardized description;
  • Understand the different application of DACS in single- and multi-level descriptive outputs;
  • Integrate DACS into basic repository processes, such as accessioning, arrangement, and description; and
  • Articulate how integration of a content standard into basic repository processes facilitates reuse of information in a variety of outputs.

Who should attend? Anyone whose work includes accessioning, arranging, and describing, or who supervises employees who do that work.

*Workshop fee includes the SAA publication, Describing Archives: A Content Standard (a $35 value!).

Attendance is limited to 35.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "Group work and accompanying discussion. All of the feedback was very educational. The entire presentation was clear, even-paced, and informative." – Peter K. Steinberg 
  • "Everyone should take this - it's a good how-to-write-finding-aids workshop, so it does double-duty!" - Judy Farrar
  • "Application of rules to practice. Hands-on activities (exercises)." – Betsy Pittman
  • "Identity elements, especially title, will make me rethink how I will supply titles in the future." – Burton Altman
  • "Clarification of what DACS is and is not, emphasis on elements rather than name formation, demonstration of output options, [and the] exercises were [all] very helpful." – Melissa Watterworth

 


 

Designing Usable Web Sites

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

What makes a good, usable Web site? How are information and mission messages effectively conveyed on the Web for archives/special collections? This workshop examines the psychological principles behind successful, user-friendly sites and challenges attendees to incorporate these principles into new or existing sites through various design features.

Workshop objectives:

  • List several concepts from cognitive psychology that affect how well users locate, navigate, and understand information;
  • Identify potential problems that users encounter on current Web sites;
  • Utilize guidelines to design an effective presentation of archival information; and
  • Recognize the role of usability testing in the (re)design of archives Web sites.

This interactive workshop includes group exercises designed to supply new tools for assessing a virtual presence on the Web and design ideas to create or improve your site.

Who should attend? New and seasoned archivists, as well as other professionals who use the Internet to provide information resources. (This workshop does not deal with HTML or the coding of features or functions that are discussed.)

Attendance is limited to 30.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • “Identification of common problems/pitfalls was most valuable.”
  • “Bibliocitations, user-centered design, link popularity check, [and] mental models are all strategies I can apply at work.”
  • “Actually examining websites and putting the morning's learning into practice was most helpful.”
  • “I valued the exercise - [I] will be able able to put into work/words what had been previously discussed. Instructor also recommended institutions to view when I get back to work.”
  • “I learned the things to do and not to do on the visual appearance of a webpage, i.e., list not longer than 5-7 items.”
  • “Focus towards meeting the users’ needs was good. Instructor explained topics very well and her informational instruction methods were well-organized.”

 


 

Digital Object Modeling and Representation: Using the Archivists' Toolkit™

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

This workshop introduces digital object modeling and representation in integrated content management systems using the Archivists' Toolkit™. Learn to create and export digital object records with hands-on training.

Workshop scope:

  • What a digital object is;
  • The important characteristics of digital objects; and
  • Community best practices for the creation and encoding of digital objects.

Workshop objectives:

  • Export digital objects from the AT in MARCXML, METS, MODS, DC;
  • Learn how these different data formats effect the representation of the digital object; and
  • Explore the intersection of digital objects and finding aids (specifically EAD).

* The instructors utilize Archivists' Toolkit™ to facilitate teaching the content of this workshop. The use of Archivists' Toolkit™ does not represent or imply SAA endorsement of this product.

Who should attend? Archivists who have attended Implementing DACS in Integrated CMS: Using the Archivists' Toolkit™, who have acquired familiarity with the Archivists' Toolkit™, or who are generally interested in the encoding of digital objects.

Attendance is limited to 25.

 


 

Digitization of Archival Materials

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Digitization technologies offer many viable solutions for improving access to textual and photographic collections, which creates many choices in undertaking digitization projects. This workshop demonstrates that technology choices are contextual and documents the key variables that inform the selection of appropriate standards, systems, and services.

Workshop objectives:

  • Discuss how to select which collections to digitize;
  • Review key definitions and concepts;
  • Examine the decisions most important to developing specific technical specifications while choosing appropriate technology and services; and
  • Observe concepts in hands-on demonstrations of document preparation and digitization workflows in a digitization laboratory.

Attendance is limited to 25.

Responses to “what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?” included:

  • “Handouts and corresponding lecture with pages for notes.”
  • “Going through the steps of scanning and all the issues to be decided beforehand.”
  • “Presented in a manner which tied all the steps for a digitization project in a clear and logical presentation.”
  • “The hands-on part gave me a much clearer view of OCR and encoding. I especially liked being able to see the programs.”
  • “Hands-on examples very useful. For example, I didn't understand how encoding worked and this gave me a great idea.”
  • “Overall discussions of decisions to be made in a digitization project.”
  • “Discussion of developing context, encoding, and presentation.”
  • “Gaining a clearer overall sense of the components of digitization projects and some of the important specifics.”

 


 

Encoded Archival Description

(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Bridge the digital divide with hands-on practice and instruction. Get acquainted with the language of XML and practice with XML authoring software. This two-day workshop covers the most up-to-date EAD version.

Workshop objectives:

  • Receive an overview of Extensible Markup Language (XML);
  • Examine the structure of EAD (the SAA-endorsed standard for archival finding aids);
  • Mark up a finding aid;
  • Explore style sheets and implementation strategies; and
  • Practice encoding a finding aid using EAD.

Who should attend? Archivists and others who are charged with exploring and/or implementing EAD at their institution or who want to enhance their résumé. BASIC COMPUTER SKILLS REQUIRED.

Attendance is limited to 25; participants may be asked to share a computer.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "Hands-on exercise marking up examples was very valuable. Handouts were great! Gave us an opportunity to learn by doing." - David Kay
  • "Having the opportunity to have questions answered and to know that we were learning the 'latest' information about EAD. Thanks for answering all of our very specific questions." - Paula Aloisio
  • "The mark-up exercises were great. I also really appreciated the opportunity to ask questions." - Johanna Carll
  • "Learning about the flexibility of EAD and its multiple applications. Information on style sheets will be very useful to me." - Mary Kenney
  • "The explanation of how EAD relates to MARC, and to html output. Many thanks!" - Terry Brown
  • "The instructors' ability to explain the material clearly to the uninitiated was enormously helpful, as well as the large amount of hands-on practice." - Lenge Hong

 


 

The Essentials of Digital Repositories

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Truly a Digital Repositories 101 seminar! Participate in knowledge-building discussions and activities that focus on defining, selecting, and implementing digital repositories (DRs). The instructors address the role of the archivist in DR construction and deployment; the standards, best practices, and realities of content and metadata deposit; the strategies for developing administrative structures; policies; the long-term preservation concerns; and the marketing. Case studies are used throughout this dynamic seminar.

Seminar objectives:

  • Understand the components necessary to implement a viable digital repository service;
  • Evaluate existing and proposed repository initiatives at your local institutions for identified elements of a successful deployment;
  • Reference existing digital repositories and the characteristics they illustrate;
  • Identify areas in which you might build your knowledge base and/or skill sets to meet the needs of a digital repository program; and
  • Recognize local areas where there is a collision of theory and practice and identify guides, models, and additional resources to help you resolve the conflicts in a viable, responsible way.

Basic knowledge of metadata schemas, of digital content creation, and of digital capture factors, and basic awareness of digital storage and preservation issues are recommended.

Who should attend? Archivists or information professionals who have working knowledge of digital collections but are in need of a digital repository primer, either because they or their unit has been identified as the ideal location for these activities or because their institutions are engaging in repository activities and seek guidance on content development, standards, preservation need, and/or marketing strategies. This seminar also appeals to new archivists, mid-career archivists who are looking to increase their knowledge base regarding digital repositories, or employees of organizations that wish to implement a digital asset management system or institutional repository.

Attendance is limited to 35.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • “Insight to 'getting started' resources. Great discussion. Great instructors.” - Jerry Simmons
  • “I found the role framework a very useful way to conceptualize repositories.” - Joseph Komljenovich
  • “The workshop covered a vast amount of material but was very well-structured.”
  • “I'll use the manual for [a] followup investigation and resource list. Thank you for this 'intro' to digital repositories for me - I have a lot of nomenclature to absorb!” - Bonnie Travers
  • “Tips on selling value and importance of archive to stakeholders. [We] identified where strengths and weaknesses [we]re to enable goal-making.”

 


 

Ethical Problem Solving

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Conflicts and ethical problems surface regularly in the workplace. SAA author, Karen Benedict, incorporates material from her book, Ethics and the Archival Profession (SAA), into this workshop. Participants will be asked to submit written copies of the problems that they want to discuss, as well as additional questions they have on the subject of ethics.

Workshop objectives:

  • Gain a better understanding of the provisions in SAA's Code of Ethics for Archivists;
  • Become aware of the difference between ethics and professional conduct;
  • Obtain the basics about best institutional practices versus ethics;
  • Discuss participant workplace problems and possible solutions; and
  • Participate in a discussion of best practice for institutions.

Who should attend? All practicing archivists will benefit from this important and timely workshop.

* Workshop includes a discount coupon for the SAA publication, Ethics and the Archival Profession, by Karen Benedict.

Attendance is limited to 25.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • “Distinguishing the differences between ethics professional conduct and institutional best practice.”
  • “Case studies were excellent.” - Marisa Ramos-Lum
  • “Fun and relaxed discussions; practical situations; people encouraged to enter discussions.”
  • “Case studies brought home the principles more correctly.”

 


 

Financial Management Basics for Archivists

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Successful archives don’t just happen – they are made! A vital part of that success is managing the archives’ financial environment. Most archivists receive little formal training in financial management. This workshop provides basic knowledge and skills needed for an archivist to become a better financial manager by introducing financial management concepts and problem-solving skills.

Workshop objectives:

  • Understand the language of financial management;
  • Develop and understand budgets and basic financial statements;
  • Evaluate services and performance; and
  • Make sound financial decisions.

Basic knowledge of Excel spreadsheets is recommended. Workshop exercises are developed for Excel 2003.

Who should attend? New and experienced archivists will appreciate this introductory skills workshop. Although the accounting segments will be geared toward nonprofit organizations, archivists from other organizations will also benefit from this workshop. Provides an archivist who is planning to jump into a management position with evidence of training to show prospective employers.

Attendance is limited to 35.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • “Discussions of applications of the information and figures/formulas.” - Paige Hendrickson
  • “Financial terminology and concepts such as 'discount rate' and 'present value', etc.”
  • “Learning the language of financial management was very, very helpful.”
  • “[A] number of practical exercises allowed for a more complex understanding of theoretical concepts.”
  • “The exercises were quite helpful. Doing these with real life situations was the most helpful.”

 


 

[NEW!]
Fundamentals of Acquision and Appraisal

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

If you are unfamiliar or uncomfortable with fundamental appraisal theory and practice, this workshop is for you! Even if you’ve read Selecting and Appraising Archives and Manuscripts (AFS II), you'll want to interact with an instructor whose quarter-century of practical appraisal experience and 12 articles exploring various aspects of appraisal theory and practice make him uniquely qualified to give you a solid foundation of appraisal knowledge. You will explore the three levels of appraisal, appraising non-traditional media, and the process of acquisition for both collecting repositories and institutional archives. You'll also be part of a lively appraisal exercise.

Workshop objectives:

  • Discuss the three levels of appraisal—institutional policy (both collecting policies and collection management policies), guidelines for subsets of creators/record groups/series, and individual collections;
  • Examine the application of appraisal to non-traditional media like sound and moving image recordings and photographs;
  • Investigate "actually getting the stuff you choose to save," or acquisition processes for collecting repositories and institutional archives;
  • Explore perhaps the most difficult aspect of appraisal, saying "no" to a potential donor or institutional unit; and
  • Engage in a highly interactive appraisal exercise designed to illustrate many of the aspects of appraisal covered in the rest of the workshop.

Who should attend? Archivists who have little to no experience in appraisal or who want a refresher on the fundamentals.

Attendance is limited to 40.

 


 

Grant Proposal Writing

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

In collaboration with Amigos Library Services, Inc.

In an era of budget cuts, learning to write better grant proposals might just pay for itself! This seminar surveys the types of state, federal, and private foundation grants available and provides information about researching and writing grant proposals. Topics include types of grants, types of funders, elements of a grant proposal, the grant review process, managing your grant project, reporting requirements, and funding resources.

Seminar objectives:

  • Understand the grant review process;
  • Differentiate between types of grants and funders;
  • Know parts of a grant proposal and where to look for resources; and
  • Identify alternative sources of funding.

Who should attend? Archivists, librarians, and other staff members who have an interest in or responsibility to explore funding resources for an institution. An emphasis on preservation grants is stressed.

Attendance is limited to 30.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "Overview and understanding of needs was exactly on target. [The instructor] gave good resources and suggestions for use.” — Mary Morganti
  • “Thorough in the basics of grant writing.” — Leah Rosenblum
  • “Presentation was clear, logical, and very accessible for someone...with little background, while still being in-depth.” — Clark Hansen
  • “URLs and resource addresses because they saved me research time.” — Shirley Burton

 


 

Implementing DACS in Integrated Content Management Systems: Using the Archivists’ Toolkit™

(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

As the next step after SAA's Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS) workshop or as further education for those already familiar with the national content standard, this intensive two-day, hands-on workshop focuses on implementation of the national content standard using an open source application. The Archivists' Toolkit™ (AT) * is one open source application available for managing information about a repository’s collections and for producing standard descriptive products. The AT supports integrated modules for accessioning, description, name and subject authority control, and location management, and also provides customizable reports and standardized description exports such as EAD, MARCXML, and METS.

Workshop objectives:

  • Create accession descriptions;
  • Create resource descriptions for collections and collection components;
  • Create and manage name and subject authorities and link them to accession and resource descriptions;
  • Record and manage physical locations within a repository;
  • Produce description output files in standardized data structures such as EAD and MARCXML;
  • Produce administrative reports;
  • Import legacy data and perform data cleanup tasks;
  • Become more familiar with DACS and how to use it, where applicable, to determine the kind and form of data recorded in the Archivists' Toolkit™;
  • Understand technical and administrative issues relevant to setting up and managing an Archivists' Toolkit™ instance at your repository.

Issues not covered in the workshop include local network configurations of the AT application, mapping of repository-specific legacy data for import, and new features added to releases after the 1.1 version.

* The use of AT in this SAA workshop does not represent or imply SAA endorsement of this or similar products. SAA is exploring development of workshops for implementing DACS using other open-source tools.

Who should attend? Archivists who’ve attended SAA’s Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS) workshop or have acquired familiarity with DACS.

Workshop attendees must bring a print copy of DACS with them to the workshop.

Attendance is limited to 25.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • “As an experienced cataloger but an inexperienced archivist, getting a better sense of which information goes into which 'bin' was invaluable. The hands-on exercises made the prospect of using this tool much less daunting.”
  • “Hands-on [experience] with a computer for each participant. Opportunity to explore all aspects of Archivists' Toolkit. Lass assignment forced me to integrate it all, so it was particularly useful.”
  • “Understanding the name and subject fields in [the] Toolkit because it allows me to be more effective in description control. Previously, I wasn't certain if I was using the Toolkit's functions appropriately.” - Chris Rockwell
  • “The progression of the exercises worked well for me, moving me through all of AT. Previously I had only focused on resources. I definitely feel fully equipped to not only implemet AT, but to use it as an administrative tool and integrate it into our IT workflow.” - Tanya Hollis
  • “It was so excellent to be instructed by those so intimately involved with the development and design of both AT and DACS - it's like having the privilege of a graduate seminar.” - Susan Lugo

 


 

Implementing DACS in Integrated Content Management Systems: Using Archon™

(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

This two-day, hands-on workshop focuses on how to describe collections according to the rules of DACS, the national content standard for preparing such descriptions within the context of one integrated content management system. Archon™ * is an open source application available for managing descriptive information about archival records and manuscript collections. The archival data elements and rules supplied by DACS are an integral component of Archon™ and provide an easy way to integrate standards-based description into a repository’s processing workflow. Practical exercises, lecture, class discussions, and demonstrations assist in learning Archon’s™ basic functions and relationships to DACS.

Workshop objectives:

  • Understand technical and administrative issues relevant to implementing Archon™;
  • Install and configure Archon™ for a specific repository and its staff members;
  • Manage physical locations within a repository;
  • Describe accessions, collections, and digital objects using Archon's™ Web forms;
  • Manage name and subject authorities, and link them to collection and digital object descriptions;
  • Produce and output descriptive records in standardized formats such as EAD and MARC;
  • Import accession, collection, and legacy finding aid records into Archon™; and
  • Customize data input screens and output files for local implementations of Archon™ to meet an individual repositories’ needs.

Issues not covered in this workshop include local network configurations, mapping of repository-specific data for import, or new features added to releases of Archon™ after version 2.1.

*The instructors utilize Archon™ to facilitate teaching the content of this workshop. The use of Archon™ does not represent or imply SAA endorsement of this product. 

Who should attend? Archivists, special collections librarians, and others with an interest in describing archival materials in an online setting. No special technical skills are required to enroll in this workshop. Registrants should have attended SAA’s Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS) workshop or have acquired familiarity with DACS. Registrants also should have read the Archon™ User Manual prior to attendance.

Attendance is limited to 25.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • “Tips and tricks - the workbook is the best I ever had at a workshop.” - Eddie Woodward
  • “This was wonderful. I can't believe we imported a database for a major collection and linked digital info - we did it. Can't wait to go home and update to 2.2” - Deborah Davis
  • “Hands-on exercises; technical information about Archon configuration - slightly more knowlege than I'd gained previously in a basic Archon workshop.” - Tomaro Taylor
  • “Interaction with developers. Use of software.” - Susan Anderson
  • “Concise explanation of this approach by [a] knowledgable person who uses it.”

 


 

Implementing “More Product, Less Process”

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Backlogs don’t have to weigh as heavily as they do! Focus on implementing concrete strategies for increasing processing rates and reducing backlogs, as outlined in the Greene-Meissner article, “More Product, Less Process: Revamping Traditional Archival Processing,” and learn as you share information and experiences with fellow workshop participants. Topics include appraisal, arrangement, description, digitization, and preservation, as well as development of processing plans, policies, and benchmarks. This array of topics is addressed through lecture, case studies, and group discussion.

Workshop objectives:

  • Understand the concepts and arguments outlined in "More Product, Less Process;"
  • Implement strategies for increasing processing rates in a variety of institutions;
  • Apply techniques for managing efficient processing programs, including developing processing plans, policies, and benchmarks;
  • Understand how descriptive standards such as DACS can assist in the creation of descriptive records that adhere to "minimum" requirements and assist in the reuse of data in a variety of outputs; and
  • Develop strategies for integrating processing with other archival functions, particularly accessioning.

Who should attend? Archivists who process archival collections or manage archival processing programs and administrators interested in processing procedures within their repositories (introductory to intermediate levels).

Attendance is limited to 35.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • “Case studies, survey results of what others are accomplishing, etc.” - Paige Hendrickson
  • “Discussion of Greene-Meissner, application of DACS to high-level processing, description of Princeton methods of reducing backlog.”
  • “Very beneficial course. We need to incorporate this process into our workflow. Great timing. We are rewriting our processing manual.”
  • “Handouts of Princeton's documents that demonstrate how the institution implemented MPLP, e.g. accessioning requirements and processing levels summary.”
  • “Concise explanation of this approach by [a] knowledgable person who uses it.”

 


 

An Introduction to Archival Exhibitions

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

This workshop presents an opportunity to explore the planning, development, and implementation of exhibitions in an archival setting! Get practical training and theoretical knowledge about developing an exhibit in a special collections setting - from the initial idea through planning, exhibiting, and beyond…. Be part of a discussion on collaboration beyond the archives: learn about advertising and marketing the exhibit, outreach and education, adding impact through the development of related events, working with the media to publicize your event, reaching a broader audience, and developing a digital component to the exhibit. Also included are practical tips on the use of readily available materials to create a professional, informative, and attractive exhibit without compromising the materials.

Workshop objectives:

  • Understand the fundamentals of developing an archival exhibit;
  • Develop potential exhibition ideas and initial plans to bring back to your home institution;
  • Use everyday materials to create polished exhibits;
  • Expand the general concept of the archival exhibition to include tie-ins with lectures, readings, campus or community events, holidays, etc.; and
  • Use tools to build an exhibit with minimal effort and cost.

Who should attend? Archives professionals, new and seasoned, who are interested in developing exhibitions within a repository, students in archival studies, and other information professionals who are considering expanding public service and outreach skills through exhibition development.

Attendance is limited to 35.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "Looking at exhibits from [a] ‘customer's’ point of view [and] not just done at end of finishing collection/samples...."
  • "Practical tips/suggestions on what works and what doesn't."
  • "Discussion of reasons to exhibit and potential collaborators."
  • "Ideas about outreach: who to contact, sample press release."
  • "Specific recommendations of materials."
  • "Creating labels section was good! Good information. Great attitude!"

 


 

Introduction to Digital Libraries and Digital Archives

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Increasing efforts to digitize print collections and digital acquisition require policies and procedures for dealing with digital content. This program thinks about digital collections and the many issues they raise: issues such as providing adequate finding aids to intangible material and ensuring long-term digital preservation. It covers a range of digital library and digital archives developments, including relevant terminology, standards, technologies, workflows, legalities, and other issues. Get a conceptual sense of what digital libraries and archives mean and learn how to begin to develop strategies for dealing with digital libraries and archives.

Questions examined in this program include:

  • How to select which collections to digitize?
  • How to develop requirements?
  • How to develop digitizing workflow?
  • Where will the technical infrastructure come from and who will support it?

Attendance is limited to 30.

Who should attend? Archivists, librarians, and museum curators seeking an introduction to digital archives and digital libraries.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • “Comparing/contrasting archives/libraries when digitized.” - Lisa Rush
  • “Discussion of various platforms and metadata.”
  • “To narrow into a specific project as an example to convince others it is valuable.” - Leanne Brindle
  • “I gained most from Rosko's experiences at MIT and his project template.”
  • “Everything from the review of familiar concepts to an excellent explanation of terms and programs with which I was less familiar.” - Valerie-Anne Lutz Van Ammers

 


 

Management of Cultural Institutions

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Professionals in cultural organizations need to balance technical skills with skills needed to manage, plan, lead, and finance institutions and employees, interns, and volunteers of institutions. In today’s fast-paced environment, professionals need management skills to create a vision and operational plans; organize teams; communicate with staff, donors, and boards; hire and retain outstanding staff; and manage risk in an era of environmental risk, rising costs, and global terrorism.

Workshop objectives:

  • Gain an overview and understanding of leadership and management;
  • Understand the use and critical importance of communication with employers, advisory boards, staff, interns, and volunteers;
  • Become aware of the critical role that staff play in every organization and of methods to improve hiring, mentoring, coaching, and supervision;
  • Appreciate the value, use, and organization of teams and teaming; and
  • Grasp the importance and use of risk management in today’s environment.

Who Should Attend? This workshop is open to archivists from all types of cultural institutions. It is designed to assist anyone who is responsible for organizing or managing agencies: one person managing a budget, a single volunteer, a mid-level manager, or an individual aspiring to become a manager or supervisor.

Attendance is limited to 30.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • “Writing a vision [and the] planning process.” - Georgette Mayo
  • “The importance of strategic planning because it is not something usually learned in library school.”
  • “The broad topics - dealing with different personalities, working with advisory groups, etc. - were particularly useful.”
  • “Personality typing - now I know what's wrong with my boss and better understand myself.”
  • “Planning and communication modules - both elements are essential in my current duties.”

 


 

Managing Literary Manuscripts: Identification, Arrangement, and Description

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Archival control practices for literary collections include practices such as calendaring individual letters chronologically to creating hierarchical series organized by literary genre. This workshop covers the identification of literary manuscripts - from notebook ideas, drafts, galleys, and page proofs to blue lines - and examines options for how these collections should be arranged and described. Hands-on exercises are designed to identify various states of literary manuscripts and to provide ample time for discussion of arrangement options in developing a processing plan. The day's work fosters an appreciation of literary research methods and an understanding of literary manuscripts as evidence of the creative process.

Workshop objectives:

  • Identify the most common stages of production, from manuscript draft through published work;
  • Distinguish the differences and similarities between literary manuscript collections and historical archival records;
  • Understand a conservative approach to appraisal issues for literary manuscripts;
  • Recognize archival descriptive standards and evaluate options in level of detail for description;
  • Decide on an arrangement strategy for literary collections;
  • Identify preservation issues that are unique to literary manuscripts; and
  • Build a processing plan that relates identification of the literary manuscripts to arrangement and description decisions.

Who should attend? Processing archivists without literary manuscripts experience, new archivists who work in repositories that collect literary papers, and manuscript curators who are new to processing archival collections. Some familiarity with arrangement and description is recommended.

Attendance is limited to 30.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • “This course is vital to anyone working in special collections and archives with literary collections. For others in the field, the course is an introduction to materials which are less familiar but important to recognize.” - Mindy Gordon.
  • “The kits were an amazing tool, beautifully produced and an invaluable hands-on exercise.” - Tanya Hollis.
  • “Discussion [was most valuable to me]. [It a]pplied our own situations, experience.”
  • “[I enjoyed the e]xplanation of the genres and versions of information comprising literary manuscripts.”
  • “Excellent, comprehensive hand-out.”

 


 

Managing the Digital University Desktop

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Learn about the research results and related electronic records training tools from the Managing the Digital University Desktop (MDUD) project. Discover strategies for training employees to manage e-mail and other electronic records by discussing current e-records management behavior as evidenced in MDUD research findings. Then get suggestions for ways in which training can be implemented in the college and/or university settings, and learn to utilize the FAQs, online tutorial, and PowerPoint presentations developed by project staff.

Workshop objectives:

  • Receive an introduction to the research-based tools developed by archivists, archival educators, and records managers for training employees to manage electronic records;
  • Learn to utilize the MDUD tool set; and
  • Discuss issues related to management of active electronic records.

Who should attend? College and university archivists and records managers, and anyone involved in training and educational activities that includes management of electronic records. Attendees should have basic knowledge of records management issues as they pertain to electronic records.

Attendance is limited to 40.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • “The book of PowerPoint slides and bibliography/resource list is very helpful, the online tools will be invaluable, and the case studies pulled it all together.” - Leslie Knoblauch
  • “I enjoyed the lecture part best because that was how I gained the most information.... The case studies were nice for discussion and differing perpectives.”
  • “The lecture part (i.e. the PowerPoint presentation); well planned and presented; got a lot of information and ideas, and the ability to customize the MDUD for our needs.” - Natalia Vogeikoff-Brogan
  • “Learning about websites, which make information available online. Group case studies were great!” - Susan Pevar

 


 

MARC According to DACS: Archival Cataloging to the National Content Standard

(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

An archivist who currently creates or anticipates creating cataloging records for archival collections won’t want to miss this extensive two-day workshop. Besides a review of the most common MARC fields used in archival cataloging, the workshop also contains information about the relationship between archival MARC, Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS) (SAA), full MARC 21 coding, and a subject analysis and authority work as they apply to archival cataloging.

Workshop objectives:

  • Learn to identify the sources of information for archival MARC 21 records, specific MARC 21 coding used in archival cataloging, and the relationship of archival cataloging records to other archival description and to bibliographic utilities;
  • Discuss cross-walking from archives, personal papers, manuscripts (APPM), and Encoded Archival Description (EAD) to MARC 21; and
  • Acquire the ability to create fully viable MARC 21 records for archival materials.

This workshop includes lecture, hands-on, and discussion components. Based on examples provided by the workshop leaders and by participants, participants will leave the workshop feeling competent in constructing MARC 21 records in individual environments.

Who should attend? This workshop will be most beneficial for beginning catalogers and more experienced catalogers who are not familiar with fields used in archival cataloging.

*Workshop fee includes the SAA publication, Describing Archives: A Content Standard (a $35 value!).

Attendance is limited to 30.

Replies to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • “This demystified the process. Makes use of archives as historians easier. Enhanced appreciation of the process.” – Arthur T. Tatum
  • “I appreciated the large number of examples from real world materials. It was a large amount of info[rmation] to take in, but the materials are well-organized and I expect to be able to use them as references without a problem.” - Jaime Margalotti.
  • "Handouts! The workbook with notes and PowerPoint slides is such a wonderful resource, especially since I'm likely to have to explain all this to my co-workers. It's also helpful to hear from two different instructors with different opinions and experiences."
  • "Layout of principles/concepts followed by helpful guided discussion. It was a very comfortable and non-threatening way to learn." - Scott Christensen
  • "Field-by-field discussions because of detail and opportunity to bring up specific scenarios." - Cheryl Walters

 


 

[NEW!]
Moving Images: An Introduction for Archivists

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Moving images — on film, videotape and now optical media — are frequently found in archival repositories. If you are more at home with paper-based materials, the presence of these machine-dependent documents can be daunting. Through illustrated lecture and short exercises, you will get an introduction to moving images in their various forms and to the challenges of their management, preservation, and use.

Workshop objectives:

  • Understand the basic history and science of moving images;
  • Recognize different types of moving images and the preservation issues associated with them;
  • Comprehend the steps involved in digitizing analog moving images;
  • Identify sources of preservation funding;
  • Take advantage of the many resources and tools now available for understanding and working with your moving image holdings; and
  • Approach management and further acquisition of moving images with increased confidence.

Who should attend? Archivists and other curators who want an introductory knowledge of moving images and how to collect, preserve, and use them. Prior experience or knowledge is not necessary.

Attendance is limited to 30.

 


 

Oral History: From Planning to Preservation

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Anticipate a successful oral history interview or project in the near future! This workshop offers a thorough overview of oral history, including its integration into archives. Topics include the value and uses of oral history, project development, recording equipment, interviewing, media storage, video interviews, and an evaluation of the digital technology of particular interest to oral historians.

Workshop objectives:

  • Developed an enhanced appreciation for the unique value of oral history;
  • Evaluated recording formats, including the most current digital options;
  • Learned about researching, framing, and conducting oral history interviews;
  • Looked at collections care, transcribing, and records keeping;
  • Grasped the ethics and legal issues pertaining to oral history;
  • Explored the promotion and use of oral history collections;
  • Hear about the challenges of the rapidly-changing technological options.

Who should attend? The workshop does not require prior oral history experience and is designed for anyone interested in the subject. Attendees with a specific interest in management of oral history collections should have an understanding of basic archival practice.

Attendance is limited to 35.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "Legal issues." - Rebecca Hankins
  • "Overview of all, very informative. [I] appreciate the information on technology changes and issues." - Rebecca Wright
  • "[It] gave me confidence and assurance to conduct oral interviews and to train others to do the same." - Virginia Davis
  • "The information on preservation methods and the changing technologies for formats. Our collection is in a stage where we need to find better formats for preservation." - Laura Eggert
  • "Real equipment examples rather than PowerPoint; shared experiences of techniques/lessons learned."
  • "Preservation and formats (cassette, video, digital) - it all changes so fast." - Michael Jackson

 


 

Planning New and Remodeled Archival Facilities

(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

When faced with the task of renovating a building or planning a new one, archivists often are unfamiliar with the building process and information needed by architects and contractors. This two-day workshop provides the knowledge and skills required to work successfully with architects, engineers, and/or facilities managers to design and build new or remodeled archival facilities: reference, storage, and public spaces designed to meet the needs of individual archival programs, staff, and users.

Using lectures, case studies, and exercises, instructors address issues such as technical requirements, building renovation, equipment (e.g. shelving), and moving an archival collection into a new or remodeled facility. A tour of a recently remodeled facility concludes the program on day two.

Workshop objectives:

  • Acquire a clear understanding of the design and building processes involved in creating new or remodeled facilities;
  • Learn about the various roles of those involved in the design process and what the archivist must do to ensure that the final building design meets collection, staff, and user needs; and
  • Develop an awareness of the technical requirements needed for archival facilities and how to communicate those needs to architects and engineers who are unfamiliar with such standards.

Who should attend? Archivists who are planning new or remodeled facilities and who have a basic understanding of archival principles and procedures and of how those principles interact with archival facilities. This workshop is also useful for managers of larger archival facilities who carry out minor or major renovation projects on an ongoing basis.

* Workshop fee includes SAA’s Planning New and Remodeled Archival Facilities by Thomas Wilsted (a $50 value!).

Attendance is limited to 40.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • “Just the existence of such a workshop was valuable. I feel as though I have at least some concrete idea of when to start my own remodel now.”— Alyson Jones
  • “Real life exercises/calculations and scenarios–very timely for upcoming remodels–very comprehensive, information that can be used for future reference.”— Julie Haugen
  • “The workshop was very useful. I've learned a lot and will be able to use my knowledge at the beginning of the next year when the construction of our building will be started.”— Ludmilla Pollock
  • “The opportunity to apply principles learned immediately to case studies enhanced the learning experience - especially because it was done in the company and with the input of archives colleagues of varying professional settings (academic, libraries, municipal, etc.). The contribution of ideas and perspectives was remarkable.”— Susan Lugo

 


 

Preservation of 20th Century Visual Materials

(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

This two-day, hands-on workshop provides examples of photographic and video materials of the 20th century, of enclosures and storage environments, as well as an understanding of the deterioration and duplication of these fragile archival materials. Learn about materials typically found in 20th century photo collections, how they deteriorate, and how to protect and store them. Gain a basic understanding of the various types of videotape, decay concerns, splicing techniques, and preservation recommendations during the video portion of this workshop.

Workshop objectives:

  • Identify the processes used to make 20th century photographs and video materials;
  • Recognize various forms of deterioration in negatives, prints, transparencies, and analog and digital video formats;
  • Choose appropriate enclosures and housings; and
  • Store photo and video collections using best practices.

Who should attend? Archivists, curators, librarians, and others responsible for photographic and video collections owned by archives of all types (public, private, university, government, religious), libraries, galleries, and historical societies. This workshop is an introduction to these types of archival materials and their preservation, so participants do not need extensive experience or knowledge.

Attendance is limited to 35.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "Pre-course readings were right on target. Pre-course questions [are] a good introduction." - Rafael Fernandez
  • "The excellent handouts and physical examples passed around the room supported the verbal instruction well, especially in the photo portion."
  • "History of photograph processes, stability/deterioration of the various photographic processes and formats, appropriate enclosures and housing. Most of this was new information for me." - Eugene T. Neely
  • "All aspects were very valuable to me. This was my first exposure to a conference/workshop like this. Any information is of great help to me." - Beth Landers

 


 

Project Management for Archivists

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Archivists are involved in a variety of projects every day- from small projects, such as developing a new procedures manual, to larger projects, such as digitizing a collection. Because project management methodologies are not automatically included in formal education or many archival education programs, take advantage of this workshop to acquire the basic knowledge and tools necessary for managing successful projects.

Workshop objectives:

  • Understand the project life cycle from initiation to completion;
  • Utilize effective project management tools and techniques;
  • Evaluate project outcomes and disseminate project information; and
  • Demonstrate how positive personnel management adds to a successful project.

Who should attend? This is an introductory workshop that can also be taken as a refresher course on project management. Project team members who want to become more active in – and achieve a better understanding of the workings of – individual projects are also welcome.

Attendance is limited to 35.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • “Practice, exercise. As always, it gives the chance to use what you've learned.”— Maria Voltera
  • “Final exercises! Good to have hands-on work.”— Ashley Enochs
  • “Great slides - the group work project at the end was especially meaningful.”
  • “Group projects are common—where these worked best was emphasis on bringing together varied experience to build the project.”— Bonita S. Smith

 


 

[NEW!]
Raising Private Monies to Support Archival Programs

(1/2 day, 0.37 CEUs, 2.5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

So you've written grants, cut your budget, tried to be frugal, and it's still not enough? Get practical advice on identifying and cultivating individuals and organizations with the potential to provide financial support to your archival program. Learn how to plan and implement fundraising strategies and "make the ask." Learn how to involve collection donors, volunteers, advisory boards, development officers, and your colleagues in raising money.

Workshop objectives:

  • Understand the basics of fundraising;
  • Develop and implement a fund raising strategy for your institution;
  • Learn about other participants' situations; and
  • Feel empowered to actively raise monies to support your programming.

Who should attend? Appropriate for all levels of archivists.

Attendance is limited to 30.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "The examples from the instructor's own experience and the questions and answers by other participants."
  • "I enjoyed receiving encouragement to make an 'ask' myself."
  • "Loved the elevator speech and six rules; good practical examples from the archival field."
  • "Was simply a good overview of topic that was informative and empowering."

 


 

[NEW!]
Rare Books for Archivists

(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

What are the basics archivists should know about rare books and why? This two-day workshop will introduce you to the management of rare books; the associated acquisition, identification, preservation, access and de-accession strategies; and the research potential for archivists and researchers.

Workshop objectives:

  • Examine rare materials hands-on to understand the codex book during the hand-press era and the machine-press era;
  • Inspect various tools of the antiquarian book trade (for acquisition, valuation, and/or deaccessioning);
  • Compare archival methodologies and rare book methodologies; and
  • Assess book collections that come with archival materials.

Presentations by other experts on subjects like strategies of preservation for rare books, and rare book cataloging for archivists complement this unique workshop.

Who should attend? Practicing archivists without formal training in bibliography or special collections librarianship who find themselves involved with rare books–either frequently or infrequently–and who wish to learn more.

Attendance is limited to 15.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "Having the opportunity to discuss qualities, characteristics and appropriate descriptions of/terminology for books while examples were in front of us were very useful. The overview of sources for determining rarity/availability and potential cost/value of books was also good. Having experts in conservation and cataloging join the workshop was wonderful and they both did a great job. Michael Laird was approachable and knowledgeable. He did a nice job of answering questions." - Donna McCrea
  • "The hands on examination of a wide variety of books was invaluable. Is there any better way to understand and appreciate how a book is made, and the changes in book structure, than to compare and contrast a wide variety of books made at different times and in different places? Great stuff." - Chris McDonald
  • "Ryan Hildebrand's presentation – DCRM (B) information– will be valuable to my immediate work."

 


 

Real World Reference: Moving Beyond Theory

(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

As anyone providing reference services to users knows, archival reference is more than handing out boxes and watching the reading room. This two-day workshop is designed to provide an overview of traditional reference service and of the challenges introduced by online databases, collections, and service venues such as e-mail and chat.

Part 1 is geared toward front-line reference professionals and focuses on the reference interaction, including orientation, the entrance and exit interviews, and providing research instruction and outreach.

Part 2 concentrates on management of reference services, including copyright, mission, and establishing and implementing reference policies and procedures. Through lecture, exercises, and group discussion, learn about developing mission statements, establishing policies and procedures, copyright basics, interlibrary loan, retrieval and handling of materials, effective use of Internet resources, and evaluating reference services.

Part 1 and Part 2 can be offered together or separately.

Workshop objectives:

  • Sharpen reference skills, including conducting the reference interview, developing a reference policies and procedures manual, balancing best practices for reference service with ensuring security for the collections, and integrating outreach and evaluation into the reference program;
  • Learn the unique challenges of providing service to users in an archival setting;
  • Examine the place of reference in the management of archives and how to best advocate for user services;
  • Discover effective ways to handle remote use, including postal, e-mail, and online chat requests;
  • Consider effective methods for working with non-traditional users, such as K-12 students and those using digital surrogates via your website; and
  • Recognize the value of outreach to patrons (and prospective patrons) to the entire archives program.

Who should attend? Part 1 is recommended for beginning and intermediate archivists. Part 2 builds on the first day and is geared to the seasoned archivist, with discussions about reference management, electronic resources, and interactions with non-traditional patron groups.

* Workshop fee includes the SAA publication, Providing Reference Services for Archives and Manuscripts (Archival Fundamentals Series II), by Mary Jo Pugh (a $35 value!).

Attendance is limited to 35.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "Exercises, group discussions. They gave me examples of other ways to approach users." - Sonia Spurlock
  • "The workshop helped add to my knowledge of reference in an archival setting, which supplemented my academic reference courses, which dealt primarily with libraries." - Ariel Segal
  • "The value of the reference person has been reinforced for me." - Bro. Louis Fournier
  • "Generally I hate group exercises, but these were done very well, especially the Researcher/Archivist 'what is the real question' and the five questions [a reference provider] need[s] to ask [the] customer." - Joan Gosnell
  • "I came hoping to get ideas/learn best practices regarding reference policies/management, and I did - a lot!" - Carole Prietto
  • "Workbook is great! Extra pages for notes used. Bibliography will assist in future situations." - Iris Godwin

 


 

[NEW!]
Records Management for Archivists

(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

You won't want to miss this practical, introductory records management workshop if you are an archivist with records management duties! In this workshop, you'll get an overview of records management principles, practices, and tools to use for establishing or continuing a records management program.

Workshop objectives:

  • Understand basic records management terminology;
  • Conduct a records inventory independently;
  • Write a records retention and disposition schedule;
  • Recognize the legal requirements for records management; and
  • Develop a basic understanding of electronic records management.

Who should attend? Archivists with beginning to intermediate knowledge of records management whose job description includes records management and/or who want to learn records management practices to enhance their job performance.

Attendance is limited to 30.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "Excellent practical training! Instructor was very knowledgeable and a good speaker. Good, data-filled (helpful) slides."
  • "Introduction to theory of RM and how it differs from archival theory; how to 'think' like a records manager."
  • "Pre-course reading, instructor's real-world experience, forms and bibliography."
  • "Case studies / group work – very helpful in talking things out."

 

Security in Archives and Manuscript Repositories

(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Archival theft continues to be big business! News of archival theft is no longer restricted to professional literature, but appears all too frequently in the mainstream media. What is stolen? Who steals? How can you fight back? This workshop explores all of these issues in depth through lectures, case studies, exercises, and discussion.

On the first day, examine the problem: look at facility design and reading room management, including essential procedures, identification, patron deportment, and more. Explore collection management - including methods of document and artifact identification, basic prevention procedures, post-theft response, and the three levels of cultural collection protection. Conclude with a group discussion.

On the second day, participate in exercises and group discussion to explore security program, policy design, and insider theft. In the afternoon learn more about advanced technology, how to work with vendors and contractors, and exhibition security, including lending artifacts and records to other repositories. The workshop concludes with an assessment of actions to lobby for changes, public relations and dealing with the media, and working with donors and trustees.

Workshop objectives:

  • Evaluate existing policies and procedures for staff and researchers, storage and reading room design, techniques of processing, collection management, and exhibit policies;
  • Choose security policies and procedures that make it easier to avoid theft or loss; and
  • Develop a repository security program, make informed choices on advanced security technology, work with vendors and contractors on a higher level, deal confidently with lending artifacts and records to other repositories, and advance the cause through lobbying, public relations, and donor/trustee relationships.

Who should attend? This workshop is appropriate for archivists and manuscript curators from every type of facility. It is especially relevant for archivists at the department-head level and administrators and managers who have the authority to modify procedures and policies within individual institutions.

Attendance is limited to 40.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • “Practical 'no cost' changes that I can implement in the reading room immediately.”
  • “[The workshop] brought to the fore important issues and viable solutions. Exercises were fun and made you think (never thought I'd say that!). Mimi and Richard were very knowledgeable and happy to take questions.” - Jeffrey Suchanek
  • “Group discussion.” - Kathy Goss
  • “Preparing for possible theft, [the] importance of buy-in of wide range of people, [and] how to respond if it does happen. Appreciated them speaking from real experience to illustrate their points.” - Amy Purcell

 


 

Style Sheets for EAD: Delivering Your Finding Aids on the Web

(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Become the master of finding aids: learn how to transform EAD-encoded finding aids into Web documents that are customized for individual institutions and for users. This two-day workshop provides an introduction to style sheets - especially in the XSLT programming language - as they are used to format archival finding aids for the Web. Participants should have a basic understanding of the EAD element set and the HTML encoding scheme so that they are ready to take the next big step and create or modify style sheets.

Workshop objectives:

  • Gain a fundamental understanding of XSLT concepts;
  • Produce a basic style sheet; and
  • Review how the style sheet affects the display of a finding aid.

Two instructors facilitate this highly interactive, hands-on workshop to provide a substantial level of practice to participants.

Who should attend? Archivists, programmers, and system administrators using TEI and other XML applications.

Attendance is limited to 25; participants may be asked to share a computer.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "It's fantastic to be able to use a computer and the software throughout the workshop. These tools make the workshop lessons learned more realistic and applicable to daily life. Much better than two days of theory without practice."
  • "Building upon concepts, from simple to more complex." - Jeremy McWilliams
  • "Even pace; excellent explanations. [The] presenters have the ability to make things appear deceptively easy." - Michelle Falke
  • "The whole thing. Before coming to the workshop, I felt like I didn't have control over how my finding aids displayed. Now I feel empowered to make significant improvements in style and useability."
  • "I think the workbook is fantastic, comprehensive, and easy to follow - and also [makes it easy] to see how to apply and change small pieces. It is obvious a lot of thought and effort went into it."

 


 

Understanding Archives: An Introduction to Principles and Practices

(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Although archivists have much in common with librarians, records managers, and museum staff, they must use different practices to protect the integrity of historical records. A strong archives program puts into practice long-standing archival principles. What are those principles and how are they implemented? This workshop provides an overview of the core archival functions of appraisal, accessioning, arrangement and description, preservation, reference, and access.

Workshop objectives:

  • Learn the terminology of archives and historical records and get an overview of the body of knowledge needed, ethical responsibilities, and resources for continuing professional development;
  • Learn the principles and functions of archival organization: provenance, respect de fonds, and original order;
  • Find out about core policy statements, professional standards, and best practices;
  • Learn how to evaluate an individual program and determine needed improvements;
  • Develop the knowledge base needed to make choices for balancing access to and preservation of historical records and holdings; and
  • Gain a greater understanding of the role of the archives in fulfilling the mission of the institution.

Who should attend? Librarians, records managers, museum staff, and administrators who have responsibility for archival records but little or no archives training.

Attendance limited to 35.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • "Practical examples were helpful. Also step-by-step instructions about processing and documentation were helpful and practical, good level of detail." - Abigail Sugahara
  • "Clearly demonstrated concepts of provenance and original order to the point where I am beginning to think like an archivist, rather than a librarian." - Robert Clymer
  • "The booklet handout was ideal: slides, examples, templates. They did a great job condensing a library school archives specialization curriculum into two days without losing meaning or overwhelming us."
  • "Visuals and explanations. Also examples helped pull [together] points I wasn't clear on." - Frances Scott

 


 

Understanding Photographs: Introduction to Archival Principles and Practices

(2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Photographs are heavily-used resources in an archives, yet many professionals lack any specialized training to deal with them effectively. This introductory workshop teaches the basics of managing and caring for photographs. Discover how to apply standard archival techniques to photographs in eight modules: reading and researching; identification and handling; preservation, storage, and housing; appraising and acquiring; accessioning and arrangement; description and cataloging; copying and digitization; and public service and outreach.

Workshop objectives:

  • Apply basic archival concepts to specific work with photographs;
  • Identify resources and techniques for understanding photographs, such as researching unidentified photographs or identifying common photo processes;
  • Learn about photograph preservation risks and concerns, such as environmental requirements and the inherent vice of nitrate- and acetate-based films;
  • Become aware of archival housing and storage options for photographic materials;
  • Learn about photograph copy services and digitization planning;
  • Discover tools, practices, and standards for processing and describing photographs;
  • Set priorities and make informed choices in appraisal and strategic planning, including consideration of legal and ethical concerns; and
  • Understand special considerations for using photographs in reference and opportunities to incorporate them in outreach.

This is the first in a series of workshops based on the SAA publication, Photographs: Archival Care and Management, by Mary Lynn Ritzenthaler and Diane Vogt-O’Connor, with contributions by Helena Zinkham, Kit Peterson, and Brett Carnell.

Who should attend? Archivists, curators, librarians, records managers, and other professionals working with photograph collections. Participants should be familiar with basic archival practice. This workshop presents the fundamental principles of administering photograph collections; and, although subjects like cataloging and digitization are discussed, participants will need additional coursework to gain a thorough understanding of specific topics.

* Workshop fee includes the SAA publication, Photographs: Archival Care and Management, by Mary Lynn Ritzenthaler and Diane Vogt-O’Connor (a $50 value!).

Attendance limited to 35.

Responses to "what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?" included:

  • “I really appreciated the emphasis on 'it depends' and that you have to make informed decisions based on your situation. There's not always (or usually) only one way! The practical little details and advice about specific questions - like actually looking at various formats of photos [and] being able to recognize them (some of them!) and feeling knowledgeable about caring for them.... Also, I was happy to learn about many resources for future questions.” - Elizabeth Howe.
  • “Discussion of preservation techniques for photographs based on [their] makeup, including digital [photographs]. Inherent issue with photo collections often [are] not covered in detail in archives literature.”
  • “Distinguishing the types of photographs and negatives. Learning the methods of preservation of the various types of photograhs.” - Tammy Hampton

 


 

Using Oral Histories: Publications, Exhibits, Internet

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

Many institutions and organizations that hold oral history collections seek ways to share these unique and valuable resources with expanded audiences. The workshop instructor explores traditional outreach tools (such as publications, exhibits, and audio and video programs) and newer technologies - including the Internet and podcasting - so that participants gain a greater appreciation of the broad range of opportunities for using oral histories in publications, programs, and other forms of outreach. The workshop offers practical information to help develop and implement oral-history-based forms of outreach, and to clearly understand the advantages and challenges of using oral histories.

Workshop objectives:

  • Learn to use tools that identify and select specific forms of outreach; and
  • Collect information and resources that will help create and effectively manage forms of outreach.

Who should attend? Participants should have attended an introductory oral history workshop or have a basic understanding and appreciation of the oral history process, as well as an interest in using oral histories for programs and outreach.

Attendance is limited to 35.

Responses to “what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?” included:

  • “Discussion of audio and video editing tools was most valuable. I currently pay for an outside person to do simple editing when, with this knowledge, I realize I can do [it] internally at much less cost.”
  • “The editing experience because it enabled us to put into practice some of what we had just learned.”— Maria S. Jolley
  • “The use of actual examples was excellent. Fred [Calabretta] is a superb instructor, once again.”— Fran Jones
  • “ Final product vs. raw footage analysis.”

 


[NEW!]
Visual Literacy for Photograph Collections

(1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs) · Classroom and AV Requirements

This workshop provides methods to gain information from photographs and to understand how this information can be applied in a practical manner to help manage, arrange, and describe collections more effectively and to help researchers to gain information from them. If you’ve attended SAA’s Understanding Photographs workshop, this is your next step. This workshop adds more concepts important for understanding the intellectual and physical nature of photographs. Incorporating these concepts into daily practice has practical and economical benefits for the archivist and provides better service to the researcher. Learn to understand the photograph as an artifact through the lens of visual literacy, then apply this understanding to photograph collection management and research uses.

Workshop objectives:

  • Examine visual literacy in depth and learn to apply this information in practical ways to arrange and describe photograph collections;
  • Demonstrate awarness of the photograph as a physical artifact;
  • Discover the importance of the concept of object and image in collection management and the difference between physical order and intellectual order;
  • Examine the intellectual and social nature of photographs;
  • Understand photographic messages, the complex collective life of photographs, and how photographic information can be obscured or changed over time; and
  • Apply this knowledge to managing photograph collections to save time and money.

Who should attend? Archivists or others who work with photograph collections and researchers wishing to understand more about finding information contained in photographs. Archivists or others who want to build on the knowledge gained from the introductory SAA Understanding Photographs workshop.

Attendance is limited to 30.

Responses to “what aspect of the workshop was most valuable to you?” included:

  • "The entire presentation was riveting."
  • "Passing around actual samples."
  • "The combination of intelligent teaching with fun exercises where we attempted to apply what we learned."
  • "Excellent information, fast paced, good visuals with good comments."

 


Last updated on: October 22, 2009