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Society of
American Archivists

17 North State Street
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Chicago, IL 60602-3315
tel 312/606-0722
fax 312/606-0728
toll-free 866/722-7858

 

ARCHIVES 2008: Archival R/Evolution & Identities

72nd Annual Meeting
Pre-conference Programs: August 24–27, 2008
Conference Dates: August 26–30, 2008
2008 Exposition Dates: August 28–29, 2008
Hilton San Francisco
333 O'Farrell Street


Repository Tours and Open Houses


San Francisco Bay Area archivists welcome you to our hometown!


Our repositories span recorded history from the 1770s to today and include a wide range of subjects, ethnic communities, organizations, and activities that reflect the diversity of people in the area – from Native Californians to present-day immigrant groups. Our archives – located throughout San Francisco City proper, East Bay, the Peninsula, and North Bay – also cover a multitude of disciplines, including natural history, science and technology, politics, law, religion, fashion, film, music, literature, arts, architecture, engineering, and more.

From August 25 to 27, we open our doors to share and showcase our local archives' commitment to document, collect, preserve, and digitize the records of our history makers. We invite you to join us and experience the enticing variety and unique archival institutions that the "City by the Bay" has to offer!

Open Houses welcome ARCHIVES 2008 attendees throughout the day during set open hours. Repository Tours are more structured: They take place at a specified time, set a maximum number of attendees, and require advance reservations made directly with the hosting repository. Some are within walking distance from the Hilton San Francisco, but others will require visitors to arrange their own means of transportation (public transit, bike, taxi, or car).


Repository Locations: Google Map


List of Tours / Open Houses:


San Francisco City Proper

East Bay

Peninsula

North Bay


San Francisco City Proper


American Bookbinders Museum
1962 Harrison St.
San Francisco, CA 94103
www.bookbindersmuseum.com

Tours
August 25, 2008
11:00 am - 7 pm

August 26, 2008
11:00 am - 7 pm

Capacity: 10-15

For reservations and information, contact Tim James at info[at]taurusbookbindery.com or 415-671-2233.

The American Bookbinders Museum focuses on trade bookbinding of the nineteenth century by preserving the equipment and the practical information about the craft as it transitioned from hand bookbinding to industrial bookmaking. This was an especially rich period in the development of United States, and the museum hopes to provide exhibits that delineate not only the craft of bookbinding during the Industrial Revolution, but also its impact on the publishing industry and its consequent social effects on literacy and education in the United States. There are no other museums in the United States focused on this period of bookbinding and publishing in American history.

In the past few decades, scholarly interest in the nineteenth-century book and the history of reading has risen sharply. Eventually the museum will also encompass a research library that will include documents on the trade that will be available to the public and scholars of reading and publishing. Originally a private collection, this small but attractive museum is newly established and in the process of widening its holdings.

Directions: From the Hilton San Francisco on O'Farrell Street, walk three (long) blocks to Market Steet. Take the BART two stops to 16th Street. Walk east on 16th Street four short blocks to Harrison Street. Turn left on Harrison. The museum is located at 1962 Harrison St. By bus: The 27 bus runs from 5th and Market Streets to 16th and Bryant, one block from the museum.



California Historical Society
678 Mission Street
San Francisco CA 94105
www.californiahistoricalsociety.org

Open House
August 26, 2008
1:00 - 5:00 pm
Capacity: 50

Tours
August 26, 2008
2:00 pm
Capacity: 16

For reservations and information, contact North Baker Research Library reference staff (Reference[at]calhist.org or 415-357-1848, ext. 220) or Mary Morganti (mmorganti[at]calhist.org or 415-357-1848, ext 242).

The California Historical Society inspires and empowers Californians to make the past a meaningful part of their contemporary lives. CHS was founded in 1871, and designated the by the state legislature in 1973 as the official historical society of California. The Society’s research collections of primary and secondary resources include over 35,000 books and pamphlets, 4,000 manuscript collections, and 500,000 photographs documenting California’s social, cultural, economic, and political history and development, along with a large collection of maps, ephemera, posters, broadsides, periodicals, and newspapers relating to the history of California and the West from the early explorations to the present time.

Current exhibition (through August 30): “The Chinese of California: A Struggle for Community,” a joint project of The Bancroft Library, California Historical Society, and Chinese Historical Society of America. From the gold country of Northern California to major metropolitan areas of Southern California and beyond, Chinese of California tells the story of the Chinese American fight for civil rights and the unique challenges that characterized the formation of Chinese communities in California.

Visitors are welcome to stop by to meet us in the library reading room from 1:00 - 5:00 pm. Staff archivists will lead a special behind-the-scenes tour for a limited number of visitors at 2:00 pm – reservations required.

Directions: CHS is located at 678 Mission Street, between New Montgomery and 3rd, near SFMOMA, a short walk from the Hilton, and convenient to several Muni bus routes and the Montgomery Street station for Muni metro and BART.



California Judicial Center Library
455 Golden Gate Avenue, Room 4617
San Francisco, CA 94102
Map

Open House
August 25-27, 2008
8:30 - 10:30 am
Capacity: 15

For reservations and information, contact Fran Jones at Fran.Jones[at]jud.ca.gov or Martha Noble at Martha.Noble[at]jud.ca.gov.

Located in the San Francisco Civic Center Complex, the California Judicial Center Library serves the California Supreme Court and the Court of Appeal, First Appellate District. CJCL's Special Collections provide a repository for the personal and professional papers of members of the California Supreme Court. Holdings include papers donated by the families of Chief Justice Niles Searls, and Justices Otto M. Kaus, Stanley Mosk and Frank C. Newman. The repository also houses records of the California Supreme Court Historical Society and books, papers and memorabilia from the estate of Bernard E. Witkin, the foremost expert on California law. Open house participants are invited to join library staff for refreshments and a tour of the repository. Historic photographs, Minute Book entries recording the first proceedings of the California Supreme Court in 1850, Bernard E. Witkin's manual typewriter, and memorabilia from the chambers of the longest serving member of the California Supreme Court, Justice Stanley Mosk, will be among the items on display.

Directions: Because the library is in a secured area, library staff will greet participants in the foyer of the Earl Warren Building.

By public transportation: Take BART or Muni Metro to the Civic Center station. Exit at Grove Street behind the Main Library and turn left, walking one block west to Larkin Street, then turn right and walk two blocks north to McAllister, then turn left and walk one-half block west to the entrance to the Earl Warren Building at 350 McAllister Street, between Larkin and Polk Streets.

By taxi: Ask the driver to go to 350 McAllister Street. Many drivers know this as the Supreme Court building.

Please note that the library's address, 455 Golden Gate Avenue, Room 4617, is associated with the adjoining building in the Civic Center Complex. However, direct access to the library is available through the Earl Warren Building, 350 McAllister Street.



Chinese Historical Society of America
965 Clay Street
San Francisco, CA 94108
www.chsa.org

Tours
August 26, 2008
9:30 - 11:00 am
Capacity: 25

For reservations and information, contact Anna Naruta at anaruta[at]chsa.org.

In 1963, to build on decades of individual and group work, community scholars, businessmen, and other community members founded the Chinese Historical Society of America to preserve and interpret Chinese American history and its interconnections with the development of the United States. Gathering the primary source materials needed to correct the long-standing omissions and distortions of traditionalist histories, CHSA became the trusted repository for organizations, individuals, and families who had experienced legalized and de facto segregation, and who had faced being targets of special investigations by the FBI and others during the McCarthy era. Join CHSA for a show and tell of highlights from the collection, and its strategies for using exhibits and online portals to increase access to pioneering scholars' research materials, methods, and interpretations.

Current exhibits: "Remembering 1882: Fighting for Civil Rights in the Shadow of the Chinese Exclusion Act" (CHSA, Yick Gallery); "To Enjoy and Defend Our American Citizenship," Chinese American organizing and work alongside groups such as the NAACP after the end of Reconstruction to challenge discriminatory laws and create the support systems necessary for survival in a segregated United States (CHSA, Philip P. Choy Gallery); and, at the California Historical Society (678 Mission, near Market and 3rd St), "The Chinese of California," a special joint exhibition by the Bancroft Library, the California Historical Society, and the Chinese Historical Society of America.

Directions: From the San Francisco Hilton, walk two blocks east to Stockton Street. Walk north (up the slight uphill incline) past Union Square and through the Stockton Tunnel. Clay Street eight blocks north at the end of the first full block after the Stockton Tunnel. Turn left on Clay and walk uphill one full block. CHSA is in the large brick building, formerly the Chinese YWCA, designed and built by Julia Morgan.

To arrive by historic cable car, from the Hilton, walk one block east to board at southeast corner of O'Farrell and Powell Streets and board the Powell-Mason Line/Taylor & Bay ($5). Exit at Powell and Clay, just after the top of the hill, and the museum is half a block downhill on your right.

Tour will start promptly at 9:30 am in the lobby designed by Julia Morgan.



Dolby Laboratories, Inc.
100 Potrero Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94103
www.dolby.com

Tours
August 26, 2008
2:00 - 4:00 pm
Capacity: 20

For reservations and information, contact Roberto Landazuri at RDL[at]dolby.com or 415-558-0264.

Dolby Laboratories was established in London in 1965 by Ray Dolby, an American engineer and physicist who in his early twenties had been the pivotal member of the Ampex Corporation team that developed the world's first practical videotape recorder. After some forty years of innovation in the entertainment chain (production, delivery, security, and licensing in the professional and consumer sectors of audio, video, broadcast, gaming, home entertainment, and cinema), Dolby Laboratories continues to improve the entertainment experience around the world. SAA visitors to Dolby's Potrero facility will visit the current Dolby Museum and Consumer Marketing exhibits and learn about the Potrero Block and Brannan Street buildings, while hearing about Dolby's historical collections.

Driving directions: (10-20 minutes) This is the quickest transportation option. However, there is street parking only, it can be tight, and it's strictly enforced. From the Hilton to Dolby: Google Map .

Public transit directions: (25-35 minutes) The advantages of this type of travel are that it's cheaper than a taxi and there are three very good burrito places around the corner from the 16th & Mission BART station (Pancho Villa, 3071 16th Street; El Toro, 598 Valencia at 17th Street; La Cumbre, 515 Valencia near 16th Street), with a fourth personal favorite burrito place that requires only a slight detour on the way to Dolby (El Tepa, 2198 Folsom at 18th Street). Although the neighborhood between the 16th Street BART and Dolby may seem a bit scruffy, it's safe around midday. Also, there's a mild upward grade on 16th Street between Harrison Street and Potrero Avenue.



Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual Transgender Historical Society
657 Mission Street #300
San Francisco, CA 94105
www.glbthistory.org

Tours
August 26, 2008
1:00 - 5:00 pm
Capacity: 10

For reservations and information, contact Rebekah Kim at rebekah[at]glbthistory.org or 415-777-5455, ext 3.

The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual Transgender Historical Society (GLBTHS) collects, preserves, and interprets the history of GLBT people and the communities that support them. The repository tour will entail a behind-the-scenes look at the Archives, where visitors would be allowed to see some of the highlights of the collection that are not on exhibit. Currently, the main gallery at the GLBT Historical Society displays the Out Ranks exhibit. It is the first exhibit in the country to explore the experiences of GLBT veterans. It charts the evolution of the U.S. military policy on homosexuality, exploring the politics of the ban on open GLBT service.

Directions: The GLBT Historical Society is about a mile from the San Francisco Hilton. You can walk to the GLBTHS by walking down to Mission Street, and we are on Mission Street between New Montgomery and 2nd. We are right next door to the Cartoon Art Museum. Visitors can also take BART, and we are closest to the Net Montgomery station.



Holocaust Center of Northern California
121 Steuart Street, Suite 10
San Francisco, CA 94105
www.hcnc.org

Tours
August 26, 2008
1:00 - 5:00 pm
Capacity: 15

For reservations and information, contact Judy Janec at jjanec[at]hcnc.org or 415-777-9060, ext 206.

The Holocaust Center of Northern California is dedicated to the remembrance of the Holocaust through its commitment to education, documentation, research, and the recording of oral testimonies of eyewitnesses to the Holocaust. Its archival collections document the events of the Holocaust through personal papers, government records, photographs, and artifacts. HCNC's Oral History Project has collected more than 1,700 oral testimonies from Holocaust survivors, refugees, liberators, and others. HCNC is also home to special collections of Yizkor (memorial) books, rare books from the Holocaust era, Holocaust-era pamphlets and periodicals, and unpublished survivor testimonies. HCNC showcases items from its archival collections through exhibits at the Center. The current exhibit features letters written by family and friends trapped in Nazi Germany and occupied Europe to their loved ones who had managed to escape.

Directions: At 333 O'Farrell Street, HCNC is accessible by foot, by car, and by public transportation. For more information on directions, check HCNC's website [www.hcnc.org/about.html].



The International Hotel Manilatown Center
868 Kearny Street
San Francisco, CA 94108
www.manilatown.org

Repository Tour
August 27, 2008
10:00 – 11:30 am

For reservation and information, contact Rissa Duque, Program Coordinator, at rissa.duque[at]manilatown.org or 415-399-9580 (fax: 415-399-8581).

The International Hotel (I-Hotel) Manilatown Center is located in San Francisco's Historic Manilatown. Although evidence of a once-thriving, ten-block Filipino community is not apparent to the tourist's eye today, in the 1920s the northeastern district of San Francisco was home to many Filipino-owned and -run businesses, restaurants, dance halls, barbershops, tenement housing, etc. However, with the city's redevelopment of the area, the low-income community was slowly displaced, and the last tenement hotel on the block, known as the I-Hotel, became a landmark in the struggle for decent and affordable housing.

The mission of Manilatown Heritage Foundation is to promote social and economic justice for Filipinos in America by preserving our history, advocating for equal access, and advancing our arts and culture. One way we are preserving our history is through our Archival Program. With the help from trained archivists, historians, and librarians, Manilatown Heritage Foundation launched our community-based archival program in December 2005. Through this program we seek to identify, collect, document, preserve, and make available primary and secondary sources to educate the community through digital media in order to increase the understanding of the history, experience, and struggles of Filipinos in America. We invite attendees of the Society for American Archivists to come to our center to learn about the work we've done, but also to offer suggestions on how to keep our collection up to par with standard archival practices.

Agenda:

  • Presentation of San Francisco's Historic Manilatown and International Hotel (I-Hotel) history
  • Presentation of Manilatown programs highlighting our Community Based Digital Archives
  • Question and Answer
  • Short tour of our facilities and the I-Hotel rooftop

Public transportation directions : Take Powell Street BART station (899 Market St). Board either a Dublin, Fremont, Pittsburg/Bay Point, or Richmond train traveling towards the East Bay. Exit Montgomery Street BART station and walk up Montgomery Street. to Jackson. Turn left on Jackson and walk up to Kearny Street. The Center is located at the corner of Kearny and Jackson. Conference participants can meet tour guide inside the I-Hotel Manilatown Center.

Driving directions: Drive east on O'Farrell Street toward Mason. Turn left onto Powell, then turn right onto Post. Turn left onto Kearny Street. The Center is located at the corner of Kearny and Jackson. Conference participants can meet tour guide inside the I-Hotel Manilatown Center.



Internet Archive
116 Sheridan Avenue
The Presidio of San Francisco Building 116
San Francisco, CA 94129
www.archive.org

Tours
August 26, 2008
11:00 am - noon

August 27, 2008
9:30 - 10:30 am

Capacity: 30 per tour, includes Q&A

For reservations and information, contact Jacques Cressaty (jacques[at]archive.org), Casey Nelson (casey[at]archive.org), or 415-561-6767.

Internet Archive, a technology nonprofit and library, is a pioneer in the field of archiving, having archived the World Wide Web since 1996. Other media included in the archives are text, audio, moving images, and live music. Guiding the tour in our library at the Presidio of San Francisco will be Kristine Hanna, Director of Web Archiving Services, and Robert Miller, Director of Books. More information on the Internet Archive and also directions to our site can be seen at www.archive.org.

Directions: The Presidio Trust has a nonstop shuttle bus that departs from the Transbay terminal at 10:30 am and arrives at the Presidio Transit Center at 10:55 am. The Transit Center is a five-minute walk to Building 116. Returning shuttle leaves at 1:00 and 2:00 pm, arriving at the Transbay Terminal at 1:25 pm and 2:25 pm respectively. The shuttle accommodates about 20 people and is free of charge during these times. It is not available outside of these hours unless you work at the Presidio and have a pass. The Presidio location gives participants the option to stroll from the archives to Crissy Field and the Golden Gate Bridge. Various restaurants are also available at the Presidio. Please visit www.presidio.gov for more information.



Labor Archives & Research Center
480 Winston Drive
San Francisco, CA 94132
www.library.sfsu.edu/about/depts/larc.php

Open House
August 26, 2008
9:30 - 11:00 am
Capacity: 12

Repository Tour
August 26, 2008
11:00 am - noon
Capacity: 12

For reservations and information, contact Catherine Powell at cpowell[at]sfsu.edu or 415-564-4010.

The Labor Archives and Research Center was founded in 1985. Our mission is to collect, preserve, and promote San Francisco Bay Area labor history. We have a rich collection of photographs (10,000 +), artifacts, ephemera, official union files, and personal records of key labor leaders. Of particular note is the People's World photograph collection, documenting working people, social justice movements, diverse cultures, and California history from the 1930s to 1980s. Our current exhibit is "Uncommon Thread: Chinatown Garment Workers and the National Dollar Store Strike of 1938."

Directions: From the San Francisco Hilton using public transit, take MUNI M Line outbound to 19th Avenue/Winston Drive stop (Stonestown Mall), walk towards the mall on the left side of Winston Drive, and take the walkway that passes underneath the building. Continue to 480 Winston Drive. On the right side of street, the sign says "Sutro Library."

If you are driving, take Market Street outbound. Market becomes Portola Drive after three miles, and after half of a mile it becomes Junipero Serra. Bear left at the major intersection, take a right onto Winston Drive, go half of a mile to 480 Winston Drive, and park in lot at Sutro Library (permits are available).

Conference participants should meet tour guide at Labor Archives, 480 Winston Drive.



Levi Strauss & Co. Archives
1155 Battery Street
San Francisco, CA 94111
www.levistrauss.com

Open House
August 26, 2008
11:00 am - 1:00 pm

For more information, contact Lynn Downey at ldowney[at]levi.com or 415-501-6577.

The Levi Strauss & Co. Archives was established in 1989 and includes garments, photographs, marketing materials, posters, documents, and artifacts dating from 1856 to the present. It is a private collection for company use only, but it will be open to SAA participants during the conference. LS&CO World Headquarters also has a Visitors Center containing exhibits on company history, clothing, advertising, corporate citizenship, and customer relations. In addition, the Visitors Center also has a new exhibit called "The Vault," which is an exhibition about the Archives: what it contains, how the company uses the collections, etc. There are short films, interactive displays of clothing, and other examples of materials from each of the Archives collections.

Directions:  Levi Strauss & Co. is located at Levi's Plaza, 1155 Battery Street, near the Embarcadero and Fisherman's Wharf.



National Park Service
Park Archives and Records Center Golden Gate National Recreation Area

Golden Gate National Parks*
Building 201, Fort Mason
San Francisco,CA 94123
www.nps.gov/goga

* This is the mailing address for the Park Archives and Records Center. Please see below for the address of and directions to the actual archives building.

Open House
August 26, 2008
10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Capacity: 12

August 27, 2008
Public Reference Hours are from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., but individuals or small groups are welcome during that time.
Capacity: 12

For reservations and information, contact Susan Ewing Haley at susan_ewing_haley[at]nps.gov or 415-561-2804.

Our facility is located in a historic Army brick cavalry stable building built in 1914. The National Park Service Archives and Records Center has occupied this facility since 1995. The Center contains over 1,000,000 documents, photographic images, oral histories, and maps that document all areas and facets of the history associated with Golden Gate NRA from Spanish exploration and the establishment of the Presidio in 1776 to the Indian occupation of Alcatraz Island in 1969, as well as the current activities of the park.

The Park Archives and Records Center houses a large collection of transferred Army records pertaining to the Presidio of San Francisco and surrounding military sites. NPS management of these Army records means that stewards have access to a continual line of information about the natural and cultural resources of lands that were formerly managed by the Department of Defense. The primary contents of this collection include over 50,000 engineering drawings and maps of military sites, individual buildings, and coastal defenses. The archives also holds any park historical collections and privately donated special collections. All archives are available for research use by the public.

The Park Archives and Records Center also manages the noncurrent records of Golden Gate NRA. A small exhibit area features rotating displays of original materials from the archives collections. Additional materials of interest will be placed on display during the SAA open house.

Directions: The Park Archives and Records Center is located in Presidio Building 667 McDowell Avenue (at Cowles Street off of Lincoln Boulevard). We are located between the cemeteries - the San Francisco National Cemetery and the Pet Cemetery, closer to the Golden Gate Bridge end of the Presidio.

If driving: From the east (downtown area) by way of Lombard Street (Highway 101), follow the signs to the Presidio entering through the Lombard Gate and following the signs to the Main Parade Ground. From the Main Parade Ground, go in the direction of the Golden Gate Bridge. You will see the National Cemetery on your left side. Once past the National Cemetery make a right onto McDowell Avenue (there should also be a sign directing you to the Stables). The Park Archives is the second brick building on the right. The entrance is on the long side of the building facing the Bay.

From the south via Highway 1/19th Avenue, get off at the last SF Exit/Golden Gate Bridge Viewing Area. Stay to the right, turning away from the bridge viewing area and towards the Presidio. At the stop sign, make a left on to Lincoln Boulevard. Follow Lincoln Boulevard going under two overpasses. Make a left onto Cowles Street (small street, kind of hidden). At the stop sign at the bottom of the hill go straight across the street into the parking lot and the first building. The entrance to the Park Archives is on the long side of the building facing the Bay.

If taking public transportation: From downtown take the 43 bus. Get off at the Letterman Hospital stop. It is about a 20 minute walk to the Park Archives. Start walking in the direction of Golden Gate Bridge or following sign markers to the Main Parade Ground. From the Main Parade Ground, walk in the direction of the Golden Gate Bridge, and you will see the National Cemetery on your left side. Once past the National Cemetery make a right onto McDowell Avenue (there should also be a sign directing you to the Stables). The Park Archives is the second brick building on the right. The entrance is on the long side of the building facing the Bay.

From the Avenues, or the west side of the city, take the 28 bus towards Fort Mason. Get off at the Golden Gate Bridge stop. Start walking toward the east of the Presidio. Follow Lincoln Boulevard going under two overpasses. Make a left onto Cowles Street (small street, kind of hidden). At the stop sign at the bottom of the hill, walk straight across the street into the parking lot and the first building. The entrance to the Park Archives is on the long side of the building facing the Bay. The Presidio Trust also runs a free shuttle around the park. Information may be found at www.presidio.gov



Prelinger Library
301 8th Street Room 215
San Francisco, California 94103
www.prelingerlibrary.org

Open House
August 27, 2008
10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Capacity: 30

For reservations or information, contact Megan Prelinger at (415) 939-2329 or megan[at]prelinger.net. Reservations welcome but not required.

The Prelinger Library is a private research library open to the public. Organized to encourage discovery and serendipity, the library holds approx. 50,000 books, periodicals, and items of print ephemera. Its arrangement follows a unique, homegrown taxonomy. The image-rich collection is appropriation-friendly and patrons are encouraged to copy materials for use in their own projects.

Directions: From the Hilton, walk four blocks south on Taylor Street to Market Street. Turn right and walk two blocks to 8th Street. Walk three blocks south on 8th Street. Library is located at 301 8th St., just south of Folsom. Ring intercom for entrance.



San Francisco History Center
San Francisco Public Library
100 Larkin Street, 6th Floor
San Francisco, CA 94102
http://sfpl.org/librarylocations/sfhistory/sfhistory.htm

For reservations and information, contact Susan Goldstein at sgoldstein[at]sfpl.org or 415-557-4567.

The San Francisco Public Library was established in 1887 and moved into its current building in April 1996. Visitors are welcome to visit the San Francisco History Center and Book Arts and Special Collections Center on the sixth floor. The San Francisco History Center contains local history, including books, periodicals, photographs, city archives, manuscripts, posters, and ephemera. Book Arts and Special Collections includes the Grabhorn Collection on the History of Printing, the Harrison Collection of Calligraphy and Lettering, the Schmulowitz Collection of Wit and Humor, and the Little Maga/Zine Collection. Current exhibits throughout the library include “Robert Sabuda: Travels through Time and Space," "Bookworks 2008: Pacific Center for the Book Arts," and "A New Deal for San Francisco: Thanks to WPA!"



San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
151 Third Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
www.sfmoma.org

Tours
August 26, 2008
10:00 - 11:30 am
Capacity: 15

For reservations and information, contact Dayna Holz at dholz[at]sfmoma.org.

As the first museum on the West Coast devoted solely to 20th-century art, the San Francisco Museum of Art ("Modern" was added to the title in 1975) opened in 1935 under the direction of Grace L. McCann Morley. In preparation for its 75th Anniversary in 2010, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) is engaged in a two-year project supported by the Getty Foundation to establish an archives program and to begin to process institutional records dating back to its opening in 1935. This portion of the project will be wrapping up as SAA comes to San Francisco, making it an ideal time to see the progress that's been made since 2006. The tour will include highlights from the archives, a tour of the Research Library, along with other activities in the works. Exhibitions on view at SFMOMA will include Frida Kahlo, The Art of Lee Miller, and "Half Life of a Dream: Contemporary Chinese Art from the Logan Collection."

Directions: From the Hilton San Francisco on O'Farrell St., walk three (long) blocks to Market Steet. Turn left on Market Street, walk about one block and turn right onto Third Street heading south. Walk about two blocks, and the Museum will be visible on the left (less than a mile total walking). Tour meets at 10:00 a.m. in front of the Minna Street staff entrance, which is to the left of the building if you're facing the front entrance.



San Francisco Museum of Performance & Design
Veterans Building, Fourth Floor
401 Van Ness Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94102
http://sfpalm.org/

Open House
August 26, 2008
2:00 - 5:00pm

For reservations and information, contact Kirsten Tanaka at kirstent[at]mpdsf.org or 415-255-4800, ext 814.

The Museum of Performance & Design (formerly San Francisco Performing Arts Library & Museum) produces world-class exhibitions, lectures, and presentations by and about leading artists; features an extensive performing arts library; provides conservation and archival services to performing arts institutions; and offers youth education programs. The Museum's Library, founded on a collection established in 1947 by San Francisco ballet dancer and designer Russell Hartley, contains over 3 million books, periodicals, playbills, clippings, photographs, posters, sheet music, plays and libretti, radio interviews, videotapes, sound recordings, oral histories, theatrical design research materials, costume and set designs, artifacts, personal papers of performers and patrons, and the archives of several world-renowned Bay Area cultural institutions, including the San Francisco Opera and the San Francisco Ballet.

During the open house, visitors will be able to see some of the Library's treasures up close and view the Museum's current exhibition, "Art & Artifice: 75 Years of Design at San Francisco Ballet," which contains original costume and set designs, set models, costumes, photographs, and video for many of the company's most memorable ballets and features the work of such world-class designers as Eugene Berman, Edward Gorey, Barbara Karinska, Willa Kim, Oliver Smith, Rouben Ter-Artunian, and Tony Walton.



Sisters of the Presentation Archives
2340 Turk Boulevard
San Francisco, CA 94118
www.presentationsisterssf.org/archives.htm

Tours
August 27, 2008
9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Capacity: 10

For reservations and information, contact Chris Doan at cdoan[at]pbvmsf.org or 415-557-4563.

Presentation Archives collects, preserves, and makes accessible the historical records of the Sisters of the Presentation, an order of Catholic religious sisters who arrived in San Francisco in 1854 from Ireland. The Sisters established schools in the early pioneering days of San Francisco, and nearly 155 years later they continue to serve in education and respond to social justice needs. The archives is housed in their convent, the last remaining Catholic women religious Motherhouse in the City. Come view early annals, photographs, and artifacts of the Sisters of the Presentation's historic ties to San Francisco. For more information on the history and ministries of the sisters please visit http://presentationsisterssf.org/history.htm.

Directions by bus: From the hotel, walk north up one block to Geary Street. Take the 38 Geary or 38 Geary Limited bus line to the Presidio Avenue stop. Cross Geary Street and head south on Masonic Avenue for 3 blocks. Turn right on Turk Boulevard. The convent is a low-rise building just past the bus shelter.  Ring the bell for the receptionist, who will direct you to the archives.



Society of California Pioneers
300 Fourth Street
San Francisco, CA 94107
www.californiapioneers.org

Tours
August 27, 2008
10:00 am
Capacity: 25

For reservations and information, contact Patricia Keats at pkeats[at]californiapioneers.org or 415-957-1849, ext 43.

Established in 1850, the Society of California Pioneers is a venue for the study and enjoyment of California history, art, and culture. It was founded by individuals who arrived in California before 1850 as a depository for documents about the settlement of the state and its history. The Society's collections include books, manuscripts, maps, ephemera, photographs, prints, paintings, and artifacts. We offer school tours, welcome researchers to our Library, and mount exhibitions as diverse as California maps to the history of baseball in the Bay Area. Current exhibits include: "Good Prospects: Life in the California Gold Fields" and "The Streets of San Francisco." The tour will entail a brief history of the Society and its collections, a tour of the Library and photograph collections, and a tour of the vaults and storage areas, which also house the artifact and art collections. Both exhibitions will be open and available to the tour, and a brief guided tour of the shows will also be provided for those interested.

Directions: From the San Francisco Hilton on Stockton Street, walk south on Stockton past Union Square and Macy's and cross Market Street. At Market, turn west and walk to Fourth Street. At Fourth, turn south (left) and walk three short blocks past Mission and Howard. The Society is at the Corner of Folsom and Fourth. Participants should gather in the lobby of the museum on the first floor.






East Bay


African American Museum and Library at Oakland
659 14th Street
Oakland, CA 94612
www.oaklandlibrary.org/AAMLO/

Open House
August 25, 2008
1:00 - 5:00 pm

Repository Tour
August 25, 2008
2:00 - 3:00 pm

For reservations and information, contact Rick Moss at rmoss[at]oaklandlibrary.org or 510-637-0200.

The African American Museum and Library at Oakland (AAMLO) is a museum and noncirculating library dedicated to preserving the history and experiences of African Americans in Northern California and the Bay Area. It contains an extensive archival collection of such artifacts as diaries, correspondence, photos, and periodicals. It is currently located in the Charles A. Greene building in Oakland, which served as the Oakland Main Library from 1902 to 1951. The AAMLO began as a private collection in 1946 and in 1964 became the East Bay Negro Historical Society, Inc. It later changed its name to the Northern California Center for Afro-American History & Life, before being incorporated into the city of Oakland in 1994 under its current name, the African American Museum and Library at Oakland.

Among the more than 160 collections in the library are archives relating to Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, the Black Panthers, Africa, and genealogy. Materials include photographs, manuscripts, letters, diaries, newspapers, recorded oral histories, videos, and microfilms. AAMLO's two galleries host changing exhibitions of art, history, and culture. Initially housed in a small shop front on Grove Street (now Martin Luther King, Jr., Boulevard), the collection grew quickly and, in 1960, moved into the Oakland Public Library's Golden Gate Branch. It officially became AAMLO, a public/private partnership, in 1994.

Directions: Take BART to Oakland City Center/12th Street station. Exit Bart to 14th Street. Walk down 14th Street, past City Hall, for three blocks. AAMLO is on the left at 14th Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Way.



Environmental Design Archives
280 Wurster Hall
University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720
http://www.ced.berkeley.edu/cedarchives/

Tours
August 25, 2008
9:00 am - 4:00 pm

August 26, 2008
9:00 am - 4:00 pm

August 28/26
10:00 am - noon

For reservations and information, contact Waverly Lowell at wlowell[at]berkeley.edu.

Established as a teaching collection in 1953, the Environmental Design Archives is committed to raising awareness of the significant architectural and landscape heritage of Northern California through collecting, preserving, and providing access to the primary records of the built environment of the region and the landscaped environment of the world. The work of most of the San Francisco Bay Region's historically significant architects and landscape architects is represented in the collections of more than 100 architects and firms. These collections contain drawings, plans, specifications, photographs, audio-tapes, personal papers, business records, furniture, art, and artifacts.

The tour will include a special subject collection that is not part of a larger library, the different ways that oversize drawings can be housed, as well as how the physical plan and furniture can facilitate reference preservation and the use of oversized records. There will also be an opportunity to view the exhibit, "Building in the Landscape: The Sea Ranch and Making Places."

Directions: The group should take BART at 5th & Powell Street, using the Richmond train. Get off at the Berkeley Station (aka Downtown Berkeley) and walk east on Center Street for one block to the campus. The tour guide will meet everyone at the campus sign. The tour will be about 20 minutes with a slight uphill walk to the Archives and can include an architectural walking tour of the campus. Otherwise, people can take the walk themselves and meet in front of Wurster Hall where the Archives is housed.



Graduate Theological Union Archives
2400 Ridge Road
Berkeley, CA 94709
http://library.gtu.edu/archives/

Tours
August 27, 2008
10:00 am - 1:00 pm

For reservations and information, contact David Stiver at dstiver[at]gtu.edu or 510-649-2507.

The Graduate Theological Union Archives collects in the area of ecumenical and interreligious activity with special interests in Women in Religion, Gays and Lesbians in Religion, New Religious Movements, and Ethnic Plurality. The collection policy reflects the nature and mission of the Graduate Theological Union, a unique consortium of nine theological seminaries, both Protestant and Catholic, and ten centers and institutes, including those of Jewish, Eastern Orthodox, Islamic, and Buddhist origin. The Archives is housed in the Flora Lamson Hewlett Library, the largest theological library in the west with a broad collection of world religions and philosophies. Staff will be available for conversation and tours.

Directions: Take BART to the Downtown Berkeley Station. Bus Lines 8 and 65 go past Euclid Avenue and Ridge. Get off near there and walk one block west on Ridge (toward the Bay) to the top of the hill. Check in at the Library Reference Desk.



Water Resources Center Archives
410 O'Brien Hall
University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720
www.lib.berkeley.edu/WRCA.

Tours
August 25, 2008
10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Capacity: 30

For reservations and information, contact Paul Atwood at patwood[at]library.berkeley.edu.

The Water Resources Center Archives (WRCA) collects, preserves, and provides access to historical and contemporary water-related materials that support the instructional and research programs of the University of California and the needs of the people of the State. WRCA was founded in 1958 when a special act of California Legislature established the California Water Resources Center to function as a University-wide, organized research unit dealing with the state's water resources problems. UC Berkeley coastal engineers and professors Morrough P. O'Brien and Joe W. Johnson are primarily responsible for establishing the Archives on the Berkeley campus. The collection focuses on the western United States but also hold materials national and international in scope.

Directions: WRCA is a 10-minute moderate walk from the Downtown Berkeley BART Station. Note that the building entrance is on the east side of O'Brien Hall. If driving, locate parking near the north entrance to campus at Hearst Avenue and Euclid Ave. Further information on directions, including a campus map, is available at www.berkeley.edu/visitors/.



Western Jewish History Center at the Judah L. Magnes Museum
2911 Russell Street
Berkeley, CA 94705
http://www.magnes.org/collections/wjhc.html

Tours
August 25, 2008
11:00 am - 4:00 pm
August 26, 2008
11:00 am - 4:00 pm

For reservations and information, contact Lara Michels at lmichels[at]magnes.org or 510-549-6950, ext. 358.

The Western Jewish History Center (WJHC) collects, preserves, and provides researchers access to archival and oral history collections from the Jewish community in the American West. The WJHC holdings encompass the entire western United States, beginning with the 1849 California Gold Rush and continuing to the present with a specific focus on the Jewish experience in California, particularly the Bay Area. The WJHC collections include personal papers, photographs, historic newspapers and periodicals, oral histories, rare books, organizational records, and objects documenting activities of individuals, families, organizations, and communities. Founded in 1967, the WJHC occupies the top floor of the Judah L. Magnes Museum in Berkeley, California. The museum is named after Judah L. Magnes, the first native-born rabbi from the American West and, subsequently, the founder of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Judah L. Magnes symbolizes the spirit of California's Jews in their achievements and contributions to global humanity.

Directions: WJHC is nearly equidistant between the Downtown Berkeley BART Station and the Rockridge BART Station. When getting off at either station, the visitor should take the 51 AC Transit Bus, which runs about every 15-20 minutes. From Rockridge BART, take the 51 bus going down College Avenue in the direction of the University of California (at Berkeley). Get off the bus on College Avenue, just past Russell Street (immediately after a 7-11). Walk up Russell until you get to our building located on the left side of the street at 2911 Russell Street.

Alternatively, from the same station the visitor can take the 7 bus and exit near the top of Russell Street at Claremont Avenue and walk down Russell Street (the building will be on the right side of the street).

When getting off at the Downtown Berkeley BART station, take the 51 bus going in the direction of the Rockridge BART station. Get off on College Avenue, just before Russell Street. Walk up Russell until you get to our building, located on the left side of the street at 2911 Russell Street.







Peninsula


Computer History Museum
1401 N. Shoreline Boulevard
Mountain View, CA 94043
www.computerhistory.org

Tours
August 26, 2008
Capacity: 20

For reservations and information, contact Paula Jabloner at jabloner[at]computerhistory.org or 650-810-1016.

The Computer History Museum is home to the world's largest collection of artifacts related to the history of computing and includes hardware, software, documents, ephemera, photographs, and moving images. The archival collection consists of over 5,000 linear feet of corporate records, personal papers, manuals, books, marketing brochures, periodicals, and technical reports. The Museum seeks to preserve a comprehensive view of computing history, one that includes the machines, software, business and competitive environments, personal recollections, and social implications of one of humankind's most important invention, the computer.

The Museum is currently undergoing a move of its collection to a new facility. Small artifacts will have moved by the SAA meeting. Come see a collection in motion. The behind-the-scenes tour will include the archival collection, large artifacts, the software repository, and the library. We will also be explain how we've integrated archival functions with general museum functions, such as in sharing one collection database across all the collections.



National Archives Pacific Region - San Francisco
1000 Commodore Drive
San Bruno, CA 94066
www.archives.gov/pacific/san-francisco

Tours
Capacity: 30

For reservations and information, contact Dan Nealand at Daniel.nealand[at]nara.gov or 650-238-3478.

Regional Archival holdings for the National Archives Pacific Region - San Francisco include 56,000 cubic feet of original records generated by Federal courts and agency field offices within our region from the 1850s to the 1970s. Our region covers northern and central California, Nevada, Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, and the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands. We also have NARA microfilm and public-use computers with free access to subscription websites popular with family history researchers. More information is available online at www.archives.gov/pacific/san-francisco/index.html. Hours: 7:30 am - 4:00 pm weekdays with extended hours until 6:00 pm on Wednesdays.

Exhibits: Four approximately 8' x 8' regional exhibits will be on display for the SAA tour: "Eyewitness, April 18 1906: the San Francisco Earthquake and Fire," "Records of the Angel Island Immigration Station," "Hollywood: Behind the Silver Screen," and "Filming Natural Resources."

Tour Info: Also known as the Leo J. Ryan Federal Building, NARA Pacific Region-San Francisco was the first NARA field facility built (in 1972) specifically to be an archives and records center. It also houses the regional NARA field Records Management Program.

The tour will include a brief PowerPoint-assisted introduction to this regional National Archives office, followed by a walkabout through the research rooms, archival stacks, and processing area, with opportunities to look at prized and unique examples of original archival holdings along the way. Also featured is a glimpse into the 900,000 cubic foot Federal Records Center, with which we share the facility.

Directions: The National Archives Pacific Region-San Francisco is located in San Bruno, California, approximately 12 miles south of San Francisco about five minutes from San Francisco International Airport.

Driving directions from the San Francisco Hilton: Go east (toward San Francisco Bay) two blocks on O'Farrell Street. Turn right onto Stockton Street. Go straight and cross Market Street, at which point Stockton Street becomes 4th Street. Stay in the middle two lanes and take the on-ramp to freeway I-80 south, which becomes US 101 South. Travel 10 miles south staying in the left three lanes. Merge onto freeway bypass I-380 west (via exit 423B toward I-280/San Bruno). Stay to the right and take the CA-82/El Camino Real exit in San Bruno. Turn right onto El Camino Real and get immediately into the left lane. After a very short distance on El Camino, turn left (west) onto Commodore Drive. After passing two blocks of condominiums, follow the street another 1/8 mile as it "corners" around the NARA Pacific Region building. A sizable parking lot for the facility is on the left. After parking, cross the street to the main entrance. The tour guide will meet you in the building lobby.

Public Transportation directions from the San Francisco Hilton: Go east one block on O'Farrell Street past Mason Street and turn right on Powell Street. Go two blocks to the BART subway station at Powell and Market Streets. Take BART southbound in the direction of Millbrae. Only the Millbrae train (not the Daly City train) goes past San Bruno. The facility is about 1/2 mile from the San Bruno BART station. From the station area, head north to Sneath Lane. Walk west on Sneath Lane to El Camino Real. From the west side of El Camino and Sneath, walk south on El Camino (away from Golden Gate National Cemetery) one block to Commodore Drive. Turn right on Commodore, and follow the street around two curves approximately one eighth mile. The NARA Pacific Region building's front entrance will be on your right. The tour guide will meet you in the building lobby.



Stanford University Campus Repositories Tour

A map (PDF) of the Stanford campus shows the locations of the libraries.

Caltrain is a train which runs from San Francisco down the Peninsula, stopping at Stanford (the Palo Alto station): http://www.caltrain.com/.

At the Palo Alto Caltrain station, there is a free shuttle called Marguerite which takes passengers around the Stanford campus: http://transportation.stanford.edu/marguerite/MargueriteShuttle.shtml.

Additional information about transportation and parking around Stanford can be found on the website for Parking & Transportation Services: http://transportation.stanford.edu/.

  • Archive of Recorded Sound
    Braun Music Center
    541 Lasuen Mall
    Stanford University
    Stanford, CA 94305-3076
    http://www-sul.stanford.edu/depts/ars/

    Tours
    August 26, 2008
    Capacity: 20

    For reservation and information, contact Aurora Perez at aperez[at]stanford.edu or 650-723-9312.

    Established in 1958, the Archive was one of the first major collections devoted to the acquisition, preservation, and dissemination of historically and artistically significant sound recordings. Researchers have a wide variety of recordings available to them, with some dating back to the late 1800s, the earliest years of sound recording. Composers performing their own music (Debussy or Ellington, for example), or poets reading their own works (Stein, Eliot, or Burroughs) provide living links to the past. The Archive houses more than 250,000 recordings and over 6,000 print and manuscript items. Almost every format developed to record sound may be found here: wax cylinders, shellac and vinyl discs, acetate and aluminum transcription discs, magnetic wire recordings, tapes, compact discs, and laser discs. An extensive reference collection of books and periodicals, including a wide range of discographies, is maintained on the history and development of the sound recording industry and its major figures. Original record manufacturers' catalogs, liner notes, photographs, and clipping files are also available. The tour will include a small exhibit of recordings from the collection and a demonstration of antique phonographs, including cylinders and 19th-century music boxes.



  • Hoover Institution Archives
    Hoover Institution
    434 Galvez Mall
    Stanford University
    Stanford, CA 94305-6010
    http://hoohila.stanford.edu

    Tours
    August 27, 2008
    11:00 am - noon
    Capacity: 15

    Contact Linda Bernard at bernard[at]hoover.stanford.edu or 650-723-0141.

    The Hoover Institution Archives, with vast original documentation on modern history, constitutes a core component of the institution that Herbert Hoover (1874–1964) founded at his alma mater, Stanford University, in 1919. In all, there are more than five thousand separate collections in the Hoover Institution Archives, including millions of individual documents from the entire range of twentieth-century history and politics around the world. Detailed descriptions of the histories and major collections of each curatorial area are available for Africa, the Americas, East Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and Russia/Commonwealth of Independent States. The poster collection is also extensively used and supplies images for documentaries, book jackets, and a growing body of work on political iconography. All this material is stored in approximately ¾ million books and 25 miles of shelving. Current collecting efforts are in place to anticipate new research trends in areas of dramatic social change. The rubrics outlined by Herbert Hoover, "war, revolution, and peace," have proved to be central to the modern experience. Although areas of collecting necessarily shift, the purpose of the records in the Hoover Institution Archives remains the same: "to promote peace."



  • Special Collections & University Archives
    Cecil H. Green Library
    Field Reading Room, Second Floor of the Bing Wing Room 200
    Department of Special Collections
    557 Escondido Mall
    Stanford, CA 94305-6004
    http://library.stanford.edu/depts/spc/

    Tours
    August 27, 2008
    9:30 - 10:30 am
    Capacity: 15

    Contact Mattie Taormina at taormina[at]stanford.edu or 650-724-4613.

    The Special Collections and University Archives Department of Stanford University Libraries is committed to acquiring, preserving, and providing access to materials of enduring historic value that support the research needs of the Stanford community and beyond. The holdings of our department are divided into three distinct and unique divisions: Manuscripts, Rare Books, and University Archives.

    The collections of the University Archives are rich sources of information regarding academics, administrative concerns, and student life, as well as the university's involvement in the development of Santa Clara Valley and the history of California and the West.

    A tour of Special Collections will include the reading room, processing rooms, and the current exhibit. You will meet your tour guide at the front doors of the Field Reading Room, on the second floor of the Bing Wing room 200.



  • Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Archives
    Archives and History Office
    M/S 82, 2575 Sand Hill Road
    Menlo Park, CA 94025
    www.slac.stanford.edu/history/

    Contact Laura O'Hara at lohara[at]slac.stanford.edu or 650-926-8584.

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is one of the world's leading research laboratories. Established in 1962 at Stanford University in Menlo Park, California, SLAC's mission is to design, construct, and operate state-of-the-art electron accelerators and related experimental facilities for use in photon science, particle physics and astrophysics, and high-energy physics research. SLAC's Archives and History Office was established by the SLAC Director in 1989 to develop policies and procedures for the evaluation and preservation of the Laboratory's documentary heritage. We will host a tour of the Archives' facilities and a brief presentation about the Archives' history and activities. In addition to its regular activities identifying, collecting, preserving and making accessible the historical record of SLAC, the Archives has been involved in preserving the first US website, as well as other electronic records, and in preparing to observe the lab's 40th anniversary with the creation of a photo history.







  • North Bay


    Charles Schulz Museum and Research Center
    2301 Hardies Lane
    Santa Rosa, CA 95403
    www.schulzmuseum.org

    Open House
    Wednesday, August 27, 2008
    11:00 am - 5:00 pm

    Repository Tour
    Wednesday, August 27, 2008
    10:00 - 11:30 am
    Capacity: 16

    For reservations and information, contact Lisa Monhoff at Lisa[at]SchulzMuseum.org or 707-284-1277.

    Tour: The tour will include a visit to the Research Center, which houses the reading room, library and archives processing area. Visitors will view some of Charles Schulz's correspondence and rarely seen Peanuts books - including Braille and Latin Peanuts editions - along with other notable ephemera and photographs from the collection. The Research Center tour will be followed by a docent-led tour of the Museum's galleries where visitors can learn how art and archival collections are displayed in exhibitions.

    About the Museum and Current Exhibitions: The Charles M. Schulz Museum and Research Center is committed to preserving, displaying, and interpreting the life and art of Charles M. Schulz, creator of the Peanuts comic strip. The Museum, which opened in 2002, includes permanent and changing exhibitions, as well as a theatre, garden courtyard, and labyrinth in the shape of Snoopy's head. Some of the permanent exhibitions include a recreation of Schulz's studio, a wall illustration he painted for his young daughter, and installations by Japanese artist Yoshiteru Otani.

    Schulz's Beethoven: Schroeder's Muse: Charles Schulz painstakingly copied musical scores, note by note, for the now-famous Beethoven strips. The music was transcribed with such accuracy that musicians are able to play the pieces directly from the Peanuts strips! In this exhibition, visitors will be able to view Beethoven-themed strips while listening to the music that Schulz transcribed into his panels. The exhibition will also feature Schulz's reference books on classical music; personal letters he wrote about his growing appreciation of the genre; original Beethoven manuscripts, scores, and first editions; paintings and a bust of Beethoven; and a fortepiano that would have been used in the early 19th century. The exhibition is being co-organized by Dr. Bill Meredith of the Ira F. Brilliant Center for Beethoven Studies, San Jose State University.

    Baseball as Allegory: Schulz commented in an interview that when he created a sports-themed strip, he did not feel that it was dealing with sports. Instead, he said, "I use it as a springboard. Charlie Brown's problems on the mound are emotional conflicts that everyone deals with." Indeed, many important life themes - hope, perseverance, humiliation, and leadership - can be found disguised in the Gang's often ill-fated baseball games. Get beneath the surface of Schulz's epic baseball strips in this exhibition featuring over 70 original Peanuts strips. This exhibition is co-curated by Stephan Pastis, creator of the comic strip Pearls Before Swine.

    Political Peanuts: Charles Schulz endured twelve presidential campaigns during his 50 years of creating Peanuts. Although he was opposed to injecting politics into the strip in an overt manner, there were times when he subtly or slyly commented on the process. The presidential election years of 1960, 1964, and 1968 all found the Peanuts Gang contemplating a run for office or actively involved in an election of one kind or another in the strip. This exhibition takes a light-hearted look at the political process in 30 Peanuts strips and politically-themed artifacts.

    Directions: From the Hilton parking garage, turn right onto Ellis. Follow Ellis for about six blocks to Van Ness Avenue/HWY 101. Turn right onto Van Ness Avenue and follow it to Lombard Street. Turn left onto Lombard Street and follow that; it eventually leads onto the entrance to the Golden Gate Bridge. Cross the bridge and continue on Highway 101 north. Santa Rosa is about 60 miles north of the Golden Gate Bridge (approximately one hour by car). Stay on Highway 101 through Santa Rosa to the north side of town. Take the Guerneville Road/Steele Lane exit; this will be the next exit after the College Avenue exit.

    At the signal after exiting Highway 101, turn left onto Steele Lane going under the freeway overpass and through signal, being sure to get into the extreme right lane. Cross Cleveland Avenue at the next signal and stay in the right lane. The street splits and Steele Lane becomes West Steele Lane which goes straight, and Guerneville Road curves to the left. Continue on West Steele Lane through the next signal at Range Avenue.

    On the right side in the next block you will see The Redwood Empire Ice Arena and Snoopy's Gallery & Gift Shop set back from the street among the trees. The Museum will be on the corner of West Steele Lane and Hardies Lane, just past the Ice Arena.

    Tour meets in lobby area of museum, which is just inside the front entrance.





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    SAA thanks the following ARCHIVES 2008 sponsors for their generous support:


    2008 International Archives & Information Technology Exposition Exhibitor List